START EV­ERY DAY SUC­CESS­FULLY

The se­cret – a morn­ing rou­tine, ac­cord­ing to some of the most ef­fec­tive and high-pow­ered peo­ple. It forces you to carve time out of a busy day for your­self. You’ll be hap­pier, more pro­duc­tive, and gen­er­ally able to slay your day.

Herworld (Malaysia) - - CONTENTS -

How to cre­ate a win­ning morn­ing rou­tine.

AN EARLY START MEANS BREEZ­ING THROUGH THE DAY FEEL­ING LIKE A QUEEN, NOT A GRUMPY OGRE.

WAKE UP TO WHAT YOU LOVE – IT EN­ER­GISES YOU

Ev­ery other day, Ser­ena Ad­sit gets to the sta­bles by 7am for horse-rid­ing ses­sions. It’s a hobby that has given her im­mense sat­is­fac­tion as her rid­ing skills have im­proved. The founder of model and tal­ent agency Mint Sin­ga­pore says her morn­ing rou­tine in­vig­o­rates her and starts the day on a pos­i­tive note. Be­sides, morn­ings are the only time she has for her­self as post-work hours are usu­ally spent with her young son or at work-re­lated events.

“In­dulging my in­ter­ests may seem like a time-waster to some peo­ple, but I’ve learnt that do­ing some­thing which makes me happy is the best way to en­joy life,” Ser­ena says. “Hav­ing work-life bal­ance also makes me more ful­filled and helps me do bet­ter at work.”

YOU’LL BE MORE OR­GAN­ISED

You don’t know what to wear to work, can’t find your keys, and there’s noth­ing to eat for break­fast be­cause you for­got to

buy more bread. Sounds fa­mil­iar? Scram­bling to pull your­self to­gether in the morn­ing puts you on the back foot for the rest of the day. So a morn­ing rou­tine helps you “get on au­topi­lot mode be­cause you are be­ing proac­tive in­stead of re­ac­tive to sit­u­a­tions”, ex­plains clin­i­cal psy­chol­o­gist Joel Yang. “Reg­u­lar­ity eases your cog­ni­tive load, helps you be­come more ef­fi­cient, and gives you mo­ti­va­tion to con­tinue be­ing pro­duc­tive for the rest of the day.”

Be­ing or­gan­ised in the morn­ings works for Jaelle Ang, CEO and co-founder of cowork­ing space The Great Room. The first thing she does when she wakes up is to spend 10 min­utes bul­let-jour­nal­ing, which in­cludes writ­ing down three things she needs to ac­com­plish that day. “Writ­ing helps me think, so I see this as a ‘brain-dump’, and it helps me feel less stressed about what’s ahead for the day,” she says.

Dur­ing this quiet time, she also puts her phone aside, so there are zero dis­trac­tions. Af­ter that’s done, she sticks to a min­i­mal makeup regime, and se­lects an out­fit from a wardrobe of dresses that all have the same sil­hou­ette. Call it her ‘work uni­form’ of sorts. “This stream­lined rou­tine gives me more men­tal band­width to fo­cus on what counts,” she adds.

IF YOU EX­ER­CISE, THE ADRENALIN KEEPS YOU GO­ING

In the age of #fit­spo, wak­ing up early to clock some miles is prac­ti­cally the norm. But the ben­e­fits of a morn­ing run ex­tend be­yond healthy liv­ing for fea­tures writer Davelle Lee. The adrenalin spike she gets from her 5am runs helps her be more pro­duc­tive.

Post-run, she em­barks on get­ting through an ex­ten­sive to-do list be­fore head­ing for the of­fice. This in­cludes oil-pulling (gar­gling co­conut oil for 20 min­utes to aid oral hy­giene), do­ing a load of laun­dry, and pre­par­ing break­fast while lis­ten­ing to the news on the ra­dio.

“My runs not only im­prove my health but my mood as well,” she says. “I con­sciously con­struct my rou­tine to in­clude house­hold chores so as to help me make the most of my morn­ing.” The sat­is­fac­tion of com­plet­ing nu­mer­ous tasks gives her clar­ity and fo­cus for the rest of the day.

YOUR MIND IS QUI­ETER

There’s a rea­son why yoga en­thu­si­asts get up at dawn to roll out their mats. “There’s a cer­tain qual­ity to prac­tis­ing yoga in the morn­ing that you just can’t get in the evening,” says Deb­bie Chua, who works in bank­ing and wakes up daily at 5.45am for a twohour yoga ses­sion. “It’s called brahma mahurta (a pe­riod of one and a half hours be­fore sun­rise), which is the time for spir­i­tual con­tem­pla­tion or med­i­ta­tion.”

Morn­ing med­i­ta­tion gives you time to be alone with your thoughts. Cre­at­ing that headspace be­fore the noise of the day sets in cul­ti­vates self­aware­ness and drives you to stay calm and fo­cus on what’s im­por­tant, says Joel.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.