IN­DUS­TRIAL REV­O­LU­TION

THE IN­EX­ORABLE IN­DUS­TRIAL STYLE IS MARCH­ING TO­WARDS OUR HOMES, THANKS TO THE F& B OUT­LETS AROUND OUR NEIGH­BOUR­HOOD THAT HAVE EM­BRACED IT SO EN­THU­SI­AS­TI­CALLY. BUT HOW DO WE TRANS­POSE THIS STYLE TO OUR HOMES? HOME & DECOR FINDS OUT.

Home & Decor (Malaysia) - - Design Buzz - text WEN­SHAN PANG pho­tos THE GREAT IN­DOORS

If our mem­ory serves us cor­rectly, the first time we saw an in­dus­trial style in­te­rior de­sign in the Klang Val­ley, al­beit not a full-fledged one, was at Alexis Bistro & Wine Bar in Bangsar Shop­ping Cen­tre circa 2006. The restau­rant fea­tures high con­crete ceil­ings with ex­posed air-con vents and elec­tri­cal wirings which are paired with oc­ca­sional bé­ton brut walls. The rawedged at­mos­phere is di­luted with an in­ge­nious mix of var­i­ous ma­te­ri­als like mar­ble, wood and plas­tic, and, with a mono­chrome colour pal­ette, the over­all vibe is chic, in­di­vid­ual and warm.

The in­dus­trial style, how­ever, did not go into full swing un­til F&B con­glom­er­ate The Big Group opened its se­ries of chain stores like Ben’s and Plan B, all of which adopted an un­apolo­get­i­cally rugged in­te­rior de­sign. Other eater­ies like Acme Bar & Cof­fee, La Vie En Rose, PH Pas­try House, Namoo On The Park and The Red Bean Bag fol­lowed suit and it is safe to say that the in­dus­trial style is the most ubiq­ui­tous in­te­rior de­sign for F&B out­lets to­day.

FORM AND FUNC­TION

“The in­dus­trial look is clas­sic. It’s prob­a­bly more of a prag­matic ap­proach than an aes­thetic one to use an in­dus­trial style in com­mer­cial projects,” say Kevin Lun­song and Juwita Jalil of The Great In­doors, who has de­signed

“HAV­ING MOSTLY NEU­TRAL TONES AND MA­TE­RI­ALS WITH UNIQUE TEX­TURES, THE IN­DUS­TRIAL LOOK IS EASY TO MATCH IN THE AS­PECTS OF FUR­NI­TURE, DEC­O­RA­TIVE PIECES AND LIGHT­ING.”

a num­ber of restau­rants and cafes like Kis­saten, But­ter & Beans and Cof­fee So­ci­ete, ex­plain­ing not only does the in­dus­trial style look great, it can with­stand wear and tear and is, in some ways, eco-friendly. Bryan Loo, owner of bub­ble tea chain Cha­time and Thai restau­rant Thai Up agrees, “I be­lieve that many F&B out­lets are mov­ing to­wards the in­dus­trial style for the flex­i­bil­ity it of­fers. Hav­ing mostly neu­tral tones and ma­te­ri­als that con­cen­trate on unique tex­tures, the in­dus­trial look is easy to match es­pe­cially in the as­pects of fur­ni­ture, dec­o­ra­tive pieces and light­ing.”

It may have only achieved pop­u­lar­ity on our shores in re­cent years, the in­dus­trial style, in fact, orig­i­nated in the SoHo sec­tion of New York City dur­ing the 1960s. For­mer ware­houses, docks, fac­to­ries were con­verted into hab­it­able homes and be­came an in­stant hit amongst the young cre­atives. The trend spread to other old in­dus­trial neigh­bour­hoods like TriBeca, Chelsea and Green­wich Vi­lage. What used to be a way of life

above One of the most defin­ing char­ac­ter­is­tics of an in­dus­trial style in­te­rior is hav­ing a mono­chrome colour pal­ette, as seen here at Kis­saten in Se­tia City Mall, de­signed by The Great In­doors. be­low Stools with metal legs and lamps with metal grilles bring to mind the in­te­rior of an old fac­tory.

TOP Cof­fee So­ci­ete in Pub­lika sports a rather toned-down ver­sion of the in­dus­trial style. ABOVE An in­dus­trial style in­te­rior is not com­plete with­out the ar­che­typal Tolix A chair – in black, no less.

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