“There’s some­thing in the mist!”

“The Mist se­duces you with one plau­si­ble the­ory af­ter an­other, but it saves its big­gest twist for the end.” Small-town para­noia meets a mil­i­tary con­spir­acy.

HWM (Malaysia) - - THINK - By Koh Wanzi

Net­flix’s Stranger Things evoked a tan­ta­liz­ing blend of 1980’s nos­tal­gia, but it was the amor­phous fear of a place not of this world that re­ally served as the show’s an­chor. The TV adap­ta­tion of Stephen King’s 1980 novella,

The Mist, draws on a sim­i­lar for­mula, but it re­places the Up­side Down with a dense, malev­o­lent fog with a life of its own. An en­tic­ing blend of fan­tasy and hor­ror, the TV se­ries puts an in­trigu­ing spin on King’s story. In­stead of gi­ant mon­sters and ten­ta­cles out to get you in the mist, you’re not ex­actly sure what is out there.

The mist re­sponds to peo­ple in dif­fer­ent ways – a tat­too of a death’s-head moth on a man’s back kills him when it shud­ders to life, and a de­vout pri­est is dragged along be­hind what looks to be the Four Horse­men of the Apoc­a­lypse.

The Mist se­duces you with one plau­si­ble the­ory af­ter an­other, but it saves its big­gest twist for the end. And along the way, it keeps you on your toes with char­ac­ters who are not who they seem, and inklings of larger and more sin­is­ter things afoot.

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