Cor­sage Mon­tage

How to choose the per­fect cor­sage and bou­ton­niere

Malaysia Tatler Wedding - - FINER DETAILS - TASHA LIM AL­LAN CASAL M PRAMALATHA

Words Styling Pho­tog­ra­phy t is in­ter­est­ing to note that the tra­di­tional cor­sage (for women) and bou­ton­niere (for men) were once worn in the 1700s to ward off dis­eases, evil spir­its and nasty smells. Oh how times have changed! Now ex­clu­sively re­served for for­mal oc­ca­sions such as wed­dings and proms, these wear­able and of­ten in­tri­cate flower ar­range­ments have be­come part and par­cel of what makes a wed­ding com­plete. Hav­ing tra­di­tion­ally been worn by the moth­ers and grand­moth­ers of the bride and groom, today it is ac­cept­able for the bride to be­stow cor­sages to close fe­male friends and other rel­a­tives—women whom she would like to hon­our, show re­spect to and ac­knowl­edge as hav­ing made a dis­cernible im­pact on her life.

A bou­ton­niere is the male equiv­a­lent of a cor­sage and is typ­i­cally a sin­gle flower or bud worn by men on their suit. Con­ven­tion­ally worn by the groom (whose ar­range­ment is gen­er­ally fuller than the rest), his grooms­men, the fa­ther of the bride and the ush­ers, it is ul­ti­mately left to the cou­ple to de­cide who to be­stow this ges­ture of ap­pre­ci­a­tion to.

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