Dza­meer Zul kif li

Malaysia Tatler - - CONCIERGE -

The last time I re­call feel­ing pa­tri­otic …

was dur­ing an as­sem­bly in a high-needs school in Perak. The stu­dents sang the na­tional an­them with so much en­ergy and pride that it made me feel hope­ful of our coun­try’s fu­ture.

I think Malaysian val­ues are …

not deeply em­bed­ded in our cul­ture just yet. There is a ten­dency for us, or at least def­i­nitely for me, to look else­where to be in­spired by a set of val­ues and cul­tures. I re­alise that I am not able to clearly ar­tic­u­late what is truly Malaysian. I still sense a di­vide be­tween the races and eco­nomic classes which many fail to no­tice due to the echo cham­ber ef­fect.

I think the best peo­ple who rep­re­sent th­ese val­ues are …

not just one per­son but re­ally young chil­dren who are ‘colour-blind’, cu­ri­ous about the world around them and in­fin­itely hope­ful for the fu­ture.

To me, be­ing a Malaysian means …

to deeply care about col­lec­tive suc­cess in­stead of in­di­vid­ual glory and to recog­nise that we need to tap on our lim­it­less cre­ativ­ity to nur­ture the plen­ti­ful resources we have been blessed with, to achieve our col­lec­tive as­pi­ra­tions. A lot of other coun­tries and so­ci­eties have achieved a lot more with even less op­por­tu­ni­ties.

To me, Malaysia Boleh means …

that we are all em­pow­ered to achieve our dreams and that we should put aside the self-lim­it­ing be­liefs we have in­cul­cated within our­selves.

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