PRO­BI­OTICS-RICH FOOD

THERE are many ways to nat­u­rally in­clude pro­bi­otics into our diet. These ben­e­fi­cial bac­te­ria are com­monly found in fer­mented food eaten across many cul­tures. Here are some ex­am­ples:

New Straits Times - - Heal - SOURCES: ADAPTED FROM: “TOP 10 PRO­BI­OTIC FOODS” WWW.GLOBALHEALINGCENTER.COM AND “18 PRO­BI­OTIC FOODS FOR A HEALTHY GUT” WWW.EATTHIS.COM

1. YOGURT

In­di­ans, Greeks and those from the Mid­dle East have tra­di­tion­ally in­cluded yogurt in their diet. It’s made by adding two strains of bac­te­ria, Strep­to­coc­cus ther­mophilus and Lac­to­bacil­lus bul­gar­i­cus, into pas­teurised milk. Goat milk yogurt is par­tic­u­larly high in pro­bi­otics.

When buy­ing yogurt, check the la­bel for the phrase “live ac­tive cul­tures” and read the in­gre­di­ents list.Many brands con­tain high fruc­tose corn syrup, ar­ti­fi­cial sweet­en­ers and ar­ti­fi­cial flavours. These will only ben­e­fit the bad bac­te­ria.

2. MISO SOUP

Miso paste is a quick and easy way to make a pro­bi­otic-rich soup that’s full of lac­to­bacilli and bi­fidus bac­te­ria.

There’s a rea­son the Ja­panese are among the health­i­est and why this soup is of­ten of­fered as an ap­pe­tiser in Ja­panese restau­rants. Miso is made by fer­ment­ing soy­beans with salt and koji — a fun­gus called Aspergillus oryzae.

Not only does it con­tain all nine es­sen­tial amino acids but be­cause it comes from soy­beans, miso also stim­u­lates the di­ges­tive sys­tem, strength­ens the im­mune sys­tem and re­duces the risk of mul­ti­ple can­cers.

3. KIM­CHI

The Kore­ans can’t get through a meal with­out it and with good rea­son. This spicy and sour fer­mented cab­bage dish is one of the best pro­bi­otic foods out there and it’s also rich in vi­ta­min C, B vi­ta­mins, beta-carotene, cal­cium, iron, potas­sium, and di­etary fibre.

The unique pro­bi­otic bac­te­ria found in kim­chi won’t just heal your gut — it will even help you stay slim, as de­ter­mined by re­searchers at Kyung Hee Univer­sity in Korea.

Lac­to­bacil­lus bre­vis, the cul­ture strain found in kim­chi, is able to sup­press a diet-in­duced in­crease in weight gain by 28 per cent.

4. TEMPEH

The hum­ble tempeh, of­ten the poor man’s food in South­east Asia, is a fer­mented, pro­bi­oti­crich grain made from soy­beans and is a good meat al­ter­na­tive.

If pre­pared cor­rectly, tempeh is also very low in salt. Be­sides be­ing a healthy op­tion for your gut, a stan­dard 3-ounce serv­ing of tempeh con­tains 16g of pro­tein and eight per cent of the day’s rec­om­mended cal­cium.

5. SAUER­KRAUT

This Ger­man favourite com­monly made from fer­mented cab­bage is not only rich in healthy live cul­tures but also boasts Vi­ta­mins A,B, C, and K.

Sauer­kraut is lacto-fer­mented cab­bage, and con­tains nat­u­ral com­pounds that have can­cer­fight­ing and stom­ach-slim­ming prop­er­ties.

When un­pas­teurised, sauer­kraut is rich in Lac­to­bacil­lus-bac­te­ria which boosts the healthy flora in the in­testi­nal tract, bol­sters the im­mune sys­tem, and im­proves over­all health.

But keep in mind that com­mer­cially pre­pared sauerkrauts may be pas­teurised and pre­pared us­ing vine­gar, which does not of­fer ben­e­fi­cial bac­te­ria.

Sauer­kraut is made of fer­mented cab­bage. CREDIT: IDEALHOUSEWIFE.FILES.WORD­PRESS. COM

The unique pro­bi­otic bac­te­ria found in kim­chi will both heal your gut and help you stay slim.

CREDIT: WWW.WIKIHOW.COM

Tempeh which is com­monly eaten in this re­gion is a source of good bac­te­ria.

CREDIT: WWW.WIKIHOW.COM

Miso soup is packed full of pro­bi­otics.

CREDIT: I.YTIMG.COM/YOUTUBE

Yogurt is a good source of pro­bi­otics.

CREDIT: WALLFLOWERKITCHEN.COM

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