No slave to tech­nol­ogy

New Straits Times - - Bots -

HOW HAS TECH­NOL­OGY HELPED IN THE GROWTH OF FILM-MAKING? Pro­duc­tion work (pre, dur­ing and post) has def­i­nitely been made much eas­ier and moved at a faster pace. Cast­ing calls are less te­dious — I can send tapes/ record­ings over WeTrans­fer (a Cloud­based com­puter file trans­fer ser­vice) and video-shoot things on my gad­get with­out hav­ing to use a pro­fes­sional cam­era.

Apart from that, thanks to In­ter­net tech­nol­ogy, I have also gained some at­ten­tion from abroad and re­ceived of­fers

for col­lab­o­ra­tion.

Go­ing dig­i­tal has also ben­e­fited young minds go­ing into the field to ex­plore ground­break­ing pur­suits in cre­ative arts. Mul­ti­me­dia Univer­sity (MMU) and The One Academy in par­tic­u­lar have been

churn­ing out good grad­u­ates.

While the de­vel­op­ments have over­all been great, there are still two sides to ev­ery coin. I think the bane for the peo­ple in­volved in ac­tu­ally keep­ing the film in­dus­try alive to­day is our fight against free file-shar­ing ser­vices where il­le­gal down­load­ing is con­cerned. Pro­tect­ing the mar­ket in to­day’s age is a

huge chal­lenge.

IN YOUR OPIN­ION, HAS TECH­NOL­OGY BEEN FULLY UTILISED BY THE LOCAL

IN­DUS­TRY?

There is still more room for im­prove­ment. I would hon­estly say that we still have a long way to go if we want to reach the same qual­ity as Hol­ly­wood which places a lot of im­por­tance on re­search and

in­no­va­tion.

That is why you get to see such well-made pro­duc­tions as Avatar, Life

Of Pi and Jungle Book.

Hav­ing said that, we are go­ing in the right di­rec­tion as more movies are

be­ing pro­duced lately with im­proved cin­e­matic ex­pe­ri­ences. The ques­tion now is whether or not we can keep the fre

quency and qual­ity con­sis­tent.

WHAT IS AC­TU­ALLY NEEDED BY LOCAL PRO­DUC­TIONS TO SUC­CEED IN

THE DIG­I­TAL AGE?

At­ti­tude. Hav­ing the will­ing­ness (en­thu­si­asm) to move for­ward is sim­ply the only way to help local pro­duc­tions

reach greater heights.

I think di­rec­tors are not so much of a prob­lem here be­cause as far as we are con­cerned, we would love to have big studios and pro­duc­ers to en­trust us with projects (and bud­gets) that in­cor­po­rate some form of tech­no­log­i­cal de­vel­op­ment which in the end would help the in­dus­try

go far.

There are plenty of cre­ative young tal­ents who are ea­ger to join in on the pur­suit al­ready. Whether or not these kids are crazy enough to do in­de­pen­dent work (boot­strap­ping) or we have enough

re­sources to “go big” (ei­ther lo­cally or be­yond our shores) — it’s just a mat­ter of

putting things into mo­tion. CAN YOU RE­CALL THE TIME TECH­NOL­OGY TOOK YOU BY

SUR­PRISE?

I think it’s when the world was in­tro­duced to Tesla’s fully autonomous car. I think the fact that tech­no­log­i­cal ad­vance­ment and the na­ture of it is so rapid that I’m left feel­ing stunned try­ing

to un­der­stand it all.

I have this wait-and-see kind of stance, an­tic­i­pat­ing the next tech break­se­cretly through but also wish­ing for the world to not turn us into dig­i­tal zom­bies. I’m not anti-tech at all but if mankind is in jeop­ardy of be­com­ing lazy then that is

where I draw the line. HOW SHOULD WE VIEW THE RIGHT

USE OF TECH­NOL­OGY THEN?

It should em­power and not en­slave us. Be­ing a fa­ther, it makes me even more con­cerned with how our chil­dren are raised. They don’t need to be fed with smart­phones

24/7 as how are they go­ing to learn how to in­ter­act with the real

world?

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