Beauty sleep

Our sleep­ing habits, what we eat or drink just be­fore bed­time and the skin­care prod­ucts we use at night — all th­ese af­fect how we look and feel, writes MEERA MU­RUGE­SAN

New Straits Times - - Focus -

WE all know that get­ting ad­e­quate rest is good for the skin.

But did you know that it’s not just about get­ting your eight hours a night?

While good, un­in­ter­rupted sleep is im­por­tant, what we do be­fore and dur­ing sleep also has an im­pact on how skin looks and feels in the morn­ing.

Our sleep­ing habits, what we eat or drink just be­fore bed­time and the skin­care prod­ucts we use at night all have an ef­fect on whether we wake up look­ing fresh and youth­ful or tired and hag­gard.

PO­SI­TION IT

While sleep­ing po­si­tions don’t cause wrin­kles, some po­si­tions and sleep­ing habits worsen or ex­ac­er­bate the for­ma­tion of both dy­namic and static wrin­kles, es­pe­cially as we age and skin loses its youth­ful elas­tic­ity, says Dr Sutina Nordin, founder and prin­ci­pal aes­thetic physi­cian of En-hanze Med­i­cal Aes­thet­ics Cen­tre.

Some peo­ple, for ex­am­ple, do things such as frown­ing and grind­ing their teeth in their sleep which can ex­ac­er­bate dy­namic wrin­kles.

Our sleep­ing habits can af­fect the skin.

CREDIT:WWW.NATURALBODY.COM

Al­ways cleanse the face be­fore bed­time. CREDIT: WWW. DRBAILEYSSKINCARE.COM

Our bed­time beauty rit­u­als and habits in­flu­ence how skin looks in the morn­ing. CREDIT:WWW.KATELAVIE.COM

Dr Sutina says as we age, our faces be­come slightly less sym­met­ri­cal and sleep­ing on one side con­stantly may ex­ac­er­bate this.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.