Hav­ing an un­di­ag­nosed STI could worsen a woman’s PMS symp­toms

Users were also asked whether they had ever been di­ag­nosed with an STI, and if so, when they re­ceived the di­ag­nosed and if they were given any treat­ment.

The Borneo Post - Nature and health - - Vital Signs -

NEW RE­SEARCH in the UK has found that women who have un­di­ag­nosed sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted in­fec­tions may be more likely to ex­pe­ri­ence neg­a­tive pre­men­strual symp­toms (PMS). Car­ried out by re­searchers at Ox­ford Univer­sity, the study was part of a long-term part­ner­ship with pe­riod-track­ing app CLUE. The team gath­ered data from 865 CLUE users who logged in­for­ma­tion on the app about their men­strual bleed­ing pat­terns, ex­pe­ri­ence of pain and emo­tions, and their hor­monal con­tra­cep­tive use.

Users were also asked whether they had ever been di­ag­nosed with an STI, and if so, when they re­ceived the di­ag­nosed and if they were given any treat­ment. The find­ings, pub­lished in the jour­nal Evo­lu­tion Medicine & Pub­lic Health, sug­gested that be­fore be­ing di­ag­nosed, women with an STI such as Ch­lamy­dia, Her­pes or HPV were more than twice as likely to re­port headaches, cramps and feel­ings of sad­ness to­wards the end of their cy­cle, and feel­ing more sen­si­tive through­out the cy­cle. The au­thors did note that the study had some lim­i­ta­tions, in­clud­ing us­ing self-re­ported data, and that the CLUE app is bi­ased to­wards record­ing neg­a­tive pre­men­strual symp­toms. How­ever, as many STI in­fec­tions go un­no­ticed due to a lack of symp­toms – for ex­am­ple 70 per cent of those di­ag­nosed with Ch­lamy­dia are un­aware that they have it – the au­thors added that the re­sults are sig­nif­i­cant and could help pre­vent ad­di­tional health prob­lems such as in­fer­til­ity.

“Even now, when I write a re­search ap­pli­ca­tion on PMS, I still think ‘will this be taken se­ri­ously?’ that needs to change. Not un­der­stand­ing or even ac­knowl­edg­ing that PMS is more than “women’s rag­ing hor­mones” but rather, the by-prod­uct of cycli­cal im­mu­nity makes it harder to iden­tify dis­eases and can even de­lay di­ag­no­sis of in­fec­tions such as STIs, which can af­fect women’s fer­til­ity,” com­mented lead au­thor Dr Alexan­dra Alvergne.

“Our re­search shows that by bet­ter un­der­stand­ing their pe­riod and men­strual cy­cle, women could po­ten­tially im­prove their health. If you know that se­vere PMS could be an in­di­ca­tor of an un­der­ly­ing STI, you are more likely to lis­ten to your body.” – Re­laxnews

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