Of a woman

The Star Malaysia - Star2 - - STYLE -

Much like ev­ery­thing else in this world, change is in­evitable and the way fra­grance is con­structed has changed the most ... Today, there are more than 1,000 fra­grances out there and you need to be able to grab the con­sumer’s at­ten­tion within the first 30 sec­onds. ca­reer in the to­tally un­re­lated field of qual­ity con­trol.

Then, she be­came an ap­pren­tice per­fumer at Roure Ber­trand Dupont, and the rest, as they say, is his­tory.

Apart from the stan­dard flo­ral (the largest scent fam­ily), ori­en­tal, cit­rus and woody fra­grances, Loren also spoke about the lesser known fougere (fern-like) fra­grances, more of­ten found in groom­ing prod­ucts, and her per­sonal favourite, chypre scents.

Chypre (which means cyprus in French) is based on a har­mony of oak moss, lab­danum, patchouli and berg­amot, and is an im­por­tant cat­e­gory of fra­grance in Europe.

The irony is, Loren her­self hardly wears any scent as she’s around fra­grances all the time, and if she does have one on, it’s prob-

ably some­thing that she’s work­ing on for the mo­ment!

Much like ev­ery­thing else in this world, change is in­evitable and the way fra­grance is con­structed has changed the most, she said.

In the past, more at­ten­tion was given to the top and heart notes of a fra­grance.

Ac­cord­ing to Loren, the “top note” will last for the first 20 or 30 min­utes.

Even­tu­ally, the per­fume will set­tle and be­come the “heart” of the scent, which lasts for about six hours.

The “base notes” of the per­fume re­main on the skin the long­est.

“But today, there are more than 1,000 fra­grances out there and you need to be able to grab the con­sumer’s at­ten­tion within the first 30 sec­onds. There’s a whole par­a­digm shift in how con­sumers view fra­grance and I see a sep­a­ra­tion in the mar­ket place.

“Now you have the con­sumer who is will­ing to pay for some­thing unique, and this con­sti­tutes the higher end of the mar­ket where he or she wants a more in­di­vid­ual scent which has more crafts­man­ship. There’s more in­volved in the cre­ation process and this means go­ing back to ba­sics, and old ac­cords are be­ing used again,” she said.

A clas­sic ex­am­ple would be Chanel No. 5, which has with­stood the test of time. Af­ter the De­pres­sion in the 1930s, sales shot through the roof as peo­ple went for a proven scent.

Then again, some scents are “dis­pos­able” as they pop up as the flavour of the month, and don’t re­ally stick around for long, for ex­am­ple, some of the celebrity-en­dorsed scents. Loren reck­ons the life­span of such scents is only about six months.

For the in­dus­try, Loren feels the over­all global view is very flat, how­ever, there are pock­ets of growth and a lot of ex­cite­ment in cer­tain re­gions around the world. “I see South-East Asia as be­ing one of those ar­eas. Al­though the cli­mate is hot and mostly hu­mid, there is a pre­dis­po­si­tion to wear­ing fra­grance and an en­thu­si­asm for it,” she con­cluded.

Fra­grance of life: Trudi Loren be­lieves the fra­grance in­dus­try is go­ing back to ba­sics to meet con­sumer de­mands for more in­di­vid­ual scents.

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