Fun facts about New Year’s Day

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The ear­li­est known New Year cel­e­bra­tions were recorded in Me­sopotamia and date back to 2000BCE.

Jan­uary is named af­ter Janus, the god with two faces, one look­ing for­ward and one look­ing back­ward.

The early Ro­mans used March 1 as New Year’s Day. Other cul­tures used the au­tumn equinox or the win­ter sol­stice to mark the new year.

In 1582, the Gre­go­rian cal­en­dar, which marks Jan 1 as the new year, was adopted by the Ro­man Catholic Church.

New Year is the time when many peo­ple tra­di­tion­ally make res­o­lu­tions to break bad habits or start good ones.

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An­cient Per­sians gave gifts of eggs on New Year’s Day, which sym­bol­ised pro­duc­tive­ness.

Most New Year tra­di­tions are be­lieved to en­sure good luck for the com­ing year. In many parts of the United States, the peo­ple ob­serve the tra­di­tion of eat­ing black-eyed peas for good luck.

Auld Lang Syne is tra­di­tion­ally sung at mid­night on New Year’s Eve. Auld Lang Syne was writ­ten by Scot­tish poet Robert Burns in 1788. He may have based it on a folk song.

The words “auld lang syne” mean “times gone by”.

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Source: edi­tion.cnn.com/2013/09/ 12/world/new-years-fast-facts.

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