Bet­ter than the movie

US band The Devil Wears Prada was the lat­est top met­al­core act to grace our shores.

The Star Malaysia - Star2 - - R.AGE - By KEVIN TAN allther­age@thes­tar.com.my

METALHEADS in Malaysia have been treated to some awe­some mu­si­cal acts re­cently, such as Un­deroath, Bring Me The Hori­zon, En­ter Shikari, Ar­chi­tects and Mem­phis May Fire, who’ve all per­formed in South East Asia over the past cou­ple of years. Now, fans can add Amer­i­can met­al­core band The Devil Wears Prada to that im­pres­sive list.

The five-man band put on a show at KL Live ear­lier this month and boy did they not dis­ap­point. Fans came in droves just to see vo­cal­ist Mike Hran­ica, lead gui­tarist Chris Rubey, rhythm gui­tarist Jeremy DePoys­ter, bassit Andy Trick and drum­mer Daniel Wil­liams live in ac­tion.

Formed in 2005 in Ohio, United States, The Devil Wears Prada – yes, they de­cided to name their band af­ter Lauren Weis­berger’s novel of the same name – have re­leased five ful­l­length al­bums and are cur­rently on tour to pro­mote their lat­est al­bum 8:18.

Al­though the band has a steady fan­base since the be­gin­ning of their ca­reer, they are still sur­prised at how well their mu­sic is re­ceived around the world.

“There was never a point where we made a huge jump in pop­u­lar­ity. It was more like ‘Woah, this is re­ally cool! Let’s do it.’ And then there’s some­thing big­ger that would hap­pen to us, and we’d do that too. And then some­thing new would hap­pen. We’re just con­tin­u­ously grow­ing,” said Rubey dur­ing an in­ter­view with R.AGE be­fore the con­cert kicked off.

And they def­i­nitely felt love from 1,500 fans who turned up and brought the house down, prompt­ing Poys­ter to post a pic­ture, on his of­fi­cial In­sta­gram ac­count (@jed­poys­ter), of the con­cert­go­ers with the cap­tion: “KL, you were too amaz­ing. Last night was one of the best feel­ings we’ve ever had on stage! Malaysia knows what’s up!”

The band got on stage af­ter open­ing acts Oh Chen­taku, The Padangs and Mas­sacre Con­spir­acy set the mood for the night and were sur­pris­ingly fast with their setup and sound check, which quickly led to their in­tro­duc­tion song – Gloom from 8:18.

Hran­ica, decked in a Pitts­burg Pen­guin hockey jersey with his name printed on the back, had splen­did show­man­ship, dis­play­ing pas­sion and sin­cer­ity in ev­ery lyric he yelled.

How­ever, it wasn’t enough to mask a slight lack of stamina and vo­cal strength.

Even while per­form­ing the first song of the night, he was al­ready out of breath and some­times just mut­tered the lyrics. For­tu­nately for him, the crowd didn’t seem to care.

The band played a whole bunch of songs from the lat­est al­bum, as well as sin­gles off their pre­vi­ous record, Dead Throne.

They also in­cluded two song from the Zom­bie EP.

Dur­ing the in­ter­view, Wil­liams noted that their band’s suc­cess came af­ter their sec­ond al­bum Plagues and said, “That was when we re­alised that we don’t have to do what all our favourite bands did; we can (have our own style) and still suc­ceed in the metal world.”

Well one of their se­crets to suc­cess has to be their beau­ti­ful show­man­ship.

Their pe­for­mance was full off en­ergy through­out the show de­spite some mi­nor tech­ni­cal dif­fi­cul­ties which un­for­tu­nately af­fected Rubey’s gui­tar tone – but of course, the fans didn’t mind as they kept the mosh pit alive.

There was no doubt the band and crowd fed off each other’s en­ergy that night.

They topped it off by end­ing with an en­core of awe­some hits such as Mam­moth, Hey John, What’s Your Name Again? and Dead Throne.

Rhythm gui­tarist Jeremy DePoys­ter said that the crowd at their re­cent per­for­mance in KL was sim­ply amaz­ing.

DePoys­ter says that all the mem­bers of the band are fans of TV sit­com TheOf­fice. They

even have a song called As­sis­tan­tToTheRe­gional

Man­ager.

Vo­cal­ist Mike Hran­ica

has also writ­ten about his a book faith and his mu­sic

called One&AHalf Hearts.

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