Scalp care

A hair­care brand in­spired by Ayurveda tells us why a sham­poo is not good enough for our scalp.

The Star Malaysia - Star2 - - Trends - By SAN­DRA LOW star2@thes­tar.com.my

HAVE you ever thought of the fact that your scalp is sim­ply an ex­ten­sion of your fa­cial skin?

Justina Me­jia-Mon­tane, vice pres­i­dent of global prod­uct de­vel­op­ment at Aveda, says in a press state­ment that, “just like your face, your scalp needs cleans­ing, bal­anc­ing and pro­tect­ing.”

“Con­sider your scalp the soil from which your hair grows. Once you think of it that way, it shouldn’t be hard to un­der­stand why you might need to be giv­ing it a lit­tle ex­tra care,” she adds.

The new Pra­masana col­lec­tion by Aveda in­tro­duces the Ex­fo­li­at­ing Scalp Brush, Pu­ri­fy­ing Scalp Cleanser and Pro­tec­tive Scalp Con­cen­trate.

Pra­masana – from the Sanskrit words “prama” (foun­da­tion) and “asana” (po­si­tion in yoga) – em­bod­ies the con­cept that a healthy scalp will make your hair look bet­ter.

Aveda was cre­ated in 1978 by Austrian hair­dresser Horst Rechel­bacher, who adopted a holis­tic way of life and in­te­grated Ayurveda, the an­cient In­dian art of heal­ing, in his life and busi­ness.

“While your scalp is an ex­ten­sion of your fa­cial skin, there is a lot of hair on the scalp and Pra­masana was de­signed specif­i­cally for the scalp,” says Claus Ha­gen­hoff, se­nior tech­ni­cal ed­u­ca­tion man­ager for Aveda Asia Pa­cific, at the launch of Pra­masana in Kuala Lumpur.

“Our skin is pro­tected by a layer of se­bum and an ac­tive com­mu­nity of mi­crobes or mi­cro­biome. The good bac­te­ria pro­tects skin while the bad causes disease,” he says.

“While we eat pro­bi­otics to keep our gut healthy, we don’t take care of the mi­cro­biome on our skin.”

Ha­gen­hoff says that if the mi­cro­biome gets out of bal­ance it af­fects the skin’s pro­tec­tive bar­rier and can lead to skin ir­ri­ta­tion, dry­ness, itch­i­ness or hair loss.

“When we pro­duce se­bum on the scalp, the mi­cro­biome eats the se­bum, leav­ing byprod­ucts that can build up and con­gest pores.

“Why do you need a scalp cleanser? You would think that any sham­poo will cleanse some­how, but its pur­pose is to clean the hair and there are dif­fer­ent sham­poos cre­ated for dif­fer­ent hair con­di­tions.

“So, you won’t treat your skin with a sham­poo be­cause it is cre­ated to treat hair.”

Like our fa­cial skin, Ha­gen­hoff says, “We don’t want to over cleanse the scalp and in­ter­fere with the mi­cro­biome ecosys­tem.”

“Aveda is about find­ing the right bal­ance of healthy mi­cro­biome, se­bum level and pro­tec­tive bar­rier for healthy scalp skin.” How is scalp re­lated to Ayurveda?

“In In­dia, be­fore women cleanse their skin they ex­fo­li­ate. So this is a tra­di­tional rit­ual In­dian women do.”

“Like­wise, this rit­ual lets you ex­fo­li­ate the scalp to loosen buildup be­fore you sham­poo your hair. Ex­fo­li­at­ing also en­er­gises the scalp and pro­vides mi­cro­cir­cu­la­tion.”

De­signed for all types of scalps, from dry, oily to nor­mal, start by ex­fo­li­at­ing with the Pra­masana Ex­fo­li­at­ing Scalp Brush, then cleanse the scalp and bal­ance se­bum lev­els with the Pu­ri­fy­ing Scalp Cleanser be­fore you sham­poo your hair.

Then, af­ter sham­poo­ing and while hair is wet, ap­ply the Pro­tec­tive Scalp Con­cen­trate which is a light­weight serum to pre­serve the scalp’s nat­u­ral pro­tec­tive bar­rier.

The Pra­masana col­lec­tion is for­mu­lated with sea­weed ex­tract to bal­ance se­bum lev­els; lac­to­bacil­lus, a patented fer­ment that pre­serves the scalp’s nat­u­ral pro­tec­tive bar­rier; and tamanu oil, an an­tiox­i­dant that pro­tects scalp from pol­lu­tion and other free rad­i­cals.

The new Pra­masana col­lec­tion by Aveda in­tro­duces the Ex­fo­li­at­ing Scalp Brush, Pu­ri­fy­ing Scalp Cleanser and Pro­tec­tive Scalp Con­cen­trate. — Pho­tos: Aveda

Ha­gen­hoff ex­plains that while your scalp is an ex­ten­sion of your fa­cial skin, there is a lot of hair on the scalp and Pra­masana was de­signed specif­i­cally for the scalp.

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