Adapt­ing to the fu­ture

The Star Malaysia - Star2 - - Course Focus | Engineering & Architecture -

THE dawn of the fourth In­dus­trial Revo­lu­tion ac­cord­ing to Ger­man en­gi­neer and econ­o­mist Klaus Sch­wab has been in progress since the mid­dle of the last cen­tury, and elec­tri­cal engi­neers are the cen­tral force of this one just like they were for pre­vi­ous ones.

The first, sec­ond and third In­dus­trial Revo­lu­tions were fo­cused on steam power, elec­tric­ity and elec­tron­ics, re­spec­tively – all within the elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing field of study.

Put sim­ply, elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing in­volves the study and ap­pli­ca­tion of en­ergy in var­i­ous forms, as well as how to har­ness and con­trol it.

While this field may not have been known by its modern name in the 18th cen­tury at the start of the first revo­lu­tion, the skills and prac­tice of these in­ven­tors even­tu­ally de­vel­oped the field of elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing.

Sch­wab dubs the fourth revo­lu­tion the Dig­i­tal Revo­lu­tion, in­di­cat­ing the rise of use and de­mand of vir­tu­ally any­thing elec­tri­cal engi­neers can cre­ate.

The global shift in fo­cus to more sus­tain­able sources of en­ergy also in­di­cates an­other realm of pos­si­bil­ity in the elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer’s hori­zon – ex­plor­ing al­ter­na­tive en­ergy.

Draw­ing from the first revo­lu­tion’s hy­dropow­ered trans­porta­tion, the sec­ond revo­lu­tion’s rise of mass pro­duc­tion and the third THE path­way to be­com­ing an en­gi­neer can be an ex­cit­ing ex­pe­ri­ence when you choose to study at Ma­ni­pal In­ter­na­tional Univer­sity (MIU) in Ni­lai.

The field of en­gi­neer­ing is be­com­ing in­creas­ingly com­pet­i­tive with thou­sands of engi­neers grad­u­at­ing each year. A firm foun­da­tion in your en­gi­neer­ing stud­ies gives you an ad­van­tage when head­ing out into the work­ing world.

The School of Science and En­gi­neer­ing at MIU is a great step­ping stone into the pro­fes­sional world as engi­neers. The cur­ricu­lum at MIU en­sures grad­u­ates are well versed in tech­ni­cal knowl­edge and equipped with skill sets re­quired by the in­dus­try.

The em­ploy­ment of engi­neers is pro­jected to grow by 4% from 2014 to 2024, con­tribut­ing to about 65,000 new jobs.

Among en­gi­neer­ing spe­cial­ties, bio­med­i­cal en­gi­neer­ing, en­vi­ron­men­tal en­gi­neer­ing and civil en­gi­neer­ing are pro­jected to be favoured by stu­dents.

At MIU, stu­dents are ex­posed to a myr­iad of devel­op­ment ac­tiv­i­ties de­signed to im­prove their crit­i­cal think­ing to ad­vance their per­sonal devel­op­ment.

Aside from this, stu­dents are taught the fun­da­men­tals of en­gi­neer­ing that en­able them to ex­cel in in­dus­tries such as man­u­fac­tur­ing, trans­porta­tion, revo­lu­tion’s boom of elec­tron­ics and in­for­ma­tion tech­nol­ogy, the Dig­i­tal Revo­lu­tion is set to amal­ga­mate a land­slide of dif­fer­ent tech­nolo­gies and fus­ing dif­fer­ent fields, with elec­tri­cal engi­neers at the cen­tre of it all.

An abun­dance of op­por­tu­ni­ties

The im­men­sity of the lo­cal and global de­mand for elec­tri­cal engi­neers is such that Malaysia is the sixth most rep­re­sented lo­ca­tion in­ter­na­tion­ally for this field on pro­fes­sional net­work­ing site LinkedIn.

As an elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer, you will join an im­pres­sive alumni: Alexan­der Gra­ham Bell, Michael Fara­day, Hein­rich Ru­dolf Hertz, Nikola Tesla, Alessan­dro Volta and Robert Wat­son-Watt, just to name a few.

In this modern, fast-paced world driven by elec­tric power and elec­tron­ics, the field of elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing will be in con­stant need of fresh young minds to take over the con­trols of the in­no­va­tion train.

In ad­di­tion, the de­mand for elec­tri­cal engi­neers is con­sis­tent in al­most every eco­nomic sec­tor from agri­cul­ture to aerospace. You can ex­pect to have the op­tion to work in a va­ri­ety of are­nas. Power plants, fac­to­ries and lab­o­ra­to­ries are only a tiny frac­tion of lo­ca­tions plant en­gi­neer­ing, oil and gas, process en­gi­neer­ing, telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions, sys­tems and ar­chi­tec­ture, soft­ware net­work­ing and se­cu­rity.

Gone are the days when one would need to be the top stu­dent and ob­tain a de­gree to se­cure a fu­ture. Cur­rent em­ploy­ers are look­ing for stu­dents who not only strive and ex­cel in their ed­u­ca­tion but are also holis­ti­cally nur­tured.

Stu­dents study­ing at MIU need not fear as they will be equipped not only with the nec­es­sary skills re­quired by the in­dus­try but also groomed with ad­e­quate soft skills where elec­tri­cal engi­neers are needed. Your job scope will vary widely de­pend­ing on whether you pur­sue paths in de­sign, main­te­nance, pro­duc­tion, plan­ning or sales, or a com­bi­na­tion of any two on the list.

With elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing, you can ex­pect to be work­ing with elec­tric power, con­trol sys­tems, mul­ti­me­dia, telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions and sig­nal pro­cess­ing among many other niche and branch ar­eas in this field.

In­no­va­tion and in­ven­tion drive the elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing field and the fo­cus is al­ways on how to do things in a bet­ter, faster, sus­tain­ably or ef­fi­ciently, or to cre­ate some­thing com­pletely new to satisfy a present need.

Elec­tri­cal engi­neers need to build a wide reper­toire of skills whether the­o­ret­i­cal or prac­ti­cal and there is no limit to how much knowl­edge you can seek and ac­cu­mu­late.

To this day, the skills of elec­tri­cal engi­neers from times past have pro­duced elec­tri­cal sys­tems, smart wire­less com­mu­ni­ca­tion de­vices, su­per­com­put­ers and mass-man­u­fac­tur­ing ro­bots, which have barely scratched the sur­face of ev­ery­thing else that could be pos­si­ble.

Jack of all trades

The ver­sa­til­ity of elec­tri­cal engi­neers’ qual­i­fi­ca­tions is an­other to be high achiev­ers in this com­pet­i­tive field.

MIU is reg­is­tered as South-East Asia’s first green univer­sity, in com­pli­ance with the United States’ Lead­er­ship in En­ergy and En­vi­ron­men­tal De­sign (LEED) Plat­inum green build­ing in­dex.

Spread across 142 acres (57.5ha) in the univer­sity town of Ni­lai, MIU’s lush green cam­pus of­fers an aca­demic en­vi­ron­ment de­signed to bring out the best in its stu­dents.

Fur­ther­more, stu­dents at MIU are en­cour­aged to take part in dif­fer­ent sport­ing ac­tiv­i­ties. A sports com­plex, lo­cated just 1km from the MIU cam­pus, pro­vides a at­trac­tive point for em­ploy­ers.

As an elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing stu­dent is re­quired to ex­plore all cur­rent ar­eas of their field, you will be study­ing power man­age­ment, project man­age­ment, fi­nan­cial and cost con­trol, en­vi­ron­men­tal ef­fect con­trol, sig­nal pro­cess­ing, in­stru­men­ta­tion and de­sign.

There is also con­sid­er­able over­lap of the elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing field of study with other en­gi­neer­ing dis­ci­plines such as the com­mu­ni­ca­tions, me­chan­ics, com­puter science and in some in­stances, the more niche ar­eas of bio­med­i­cal science and nan­otech­nol­ogy.

Cer­tain per­son­al­ity traits are highly val­ued in the field of elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing. Pa­tience and per­se­ver­ance are main char­ac­ter­is­tics em­ploy­ers look for.

Other than that, a sense of cu­rios­ity and in­quis­i­tive­ness com­bined with an an­a­lyt­i­cal mind will aid you in your jour­ney, for those traits will help you solve prob­lems and pre­dict log­i­cal out­comes in the field. Some other de­sir­able traits are listed be­low.

Lead­er­ship and com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills gym­na­sium, bad­minton court, bowl­ing al­ley and karaoke cen­tre.

Upon com­ple­tion of their ini­tial years, stu­dents have the flex­i­bil­ity to fur­ther their stud­ies in the coun­try of their choice as the twin­ning pro­gramme at MIU al­lows stu­dents to com­plete their de­gree pro­gramme over­seas.

MIU is a mem­ber of the Ma­ni­pal Global Ed­u­ca­tion Group and a fullfledged Malaysian univer­sity of­fer­ing mul­ti­dis­ci­plinary pro­grammes with fo­cus in the fields of science, en­gi­neer­ing, and man­age­ment and busi­ness.

The Ma­ni­pal Global Ed­u­ca­tion Group is re­spon­si­ble for hav­ing An abil­ity to nav­i­gate group dis­cus­sions and man­age del­e­ga­tion of tasks is im­por­tant as you will of­ten work in teams and in a de­ci­sion-mak­ing po­si­tion.

Clear think­ing skills – You will need to be able to de­velop and present an idea or de­sign in a clear, con­cise man­ner and be able to ex­plain your de­ci­sions to any­one from a lay­man to a field ex­pert.

Fi­nan­cial aware­ness – Few projects come with­out a bud­get or cost cap, and the skill to man­age costs is as equally im­por­tant as other more tech­ni­cal skills.

Punc­tu­al­ity and time­li­ness – Many en­gi­neer­ing prac­tices come with dead­lines at­tached to them. Train your­self to be on time or early for ev­ery­thing from your ar­rival at a workspace to sub­mit­ting projects.

Plan­ning skills – The hours of an elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer are long and de­mand­ing, and an abil­ity to man­age your time well is in­valu­able in this field. Ev­ery­thing in the field is on a time­line with a dead­line, so be pre­pared for what­ever might come your way. pro­duced some of the bright­est minds in Asia for the past 60 years.

Through its in­tern­ship pro­gramme, each stu­dent is given the chance to put knowl­edge into prac­tice within the work­ing en­vi­ron­ment.

With nine aca­demic part­ners, stu­dents can also opt for credit trans­fer pro­grammes with par­tic­i­pat­ing uni­ver­si­ties.

As part of its of­fer, MIU is pro­vid­ing up to 100% schol­ar­ship on tu­ition for the foun­da­tion pro­grammes for stu­dents who ex­cel in their Si­jil Pe­la­jaran Malaysia (SPM). A se­mes­ter's tu­ition will be waived if they progress to un­der­grad­u­ate pro­grammes at MIU.

For the diploma pro­grammes, stu­dents with three cred­its in their SPM will re­ceive a 40% schol­ar­ship while stu­dents en­rolling in the de­gree pro­grammes are of­fered up to 50% schol­ar­ships based on their CGPA. Terms and con­di­tions ap­ply.

For con­sul­ta­tion, visit MIU’s lake­side cam­pus in Ni­lai on work days from 10am to 6pm. Reg­is­tra­tion is open in­clud­ing on week­ends.

For more in­for­ma­tion, call 1800 222 648 or visit www.miu. edu.my.

Many pub­lic, pri­vate and for­eign branch cam­puses of­fer cour­ses in elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing in Malaysia. Pub­lic univer­sity cour­ses are ap­plied to via UPU (Malaysia's Higher Ed­u­ca­tion Min­istry 's en­rol­ment Pri­vate In­sti­tu­tions AIMST Univer­sity

Asia Pa­cific Univer­sity of Tech­nol­ogy and In­no­va­tion (APU) In­ter­na­tional Is­lamic Univer­sity Malaysia (IIUM)

In­fras­truc­ture Univer­sity Kuala Lumpur (IUKL)

INTI In­ter­na­tional Univer­sity

KDU Univer­sity Col­lege, Utropo­lis Glen­marie

Ma­ni­pal In­ter­na­tional Univer­sity (MIU)

Mul­ti­me­dia Univer­sity (MMU) sys­tem for pub­lic uni­ver­si­ties). While they may have sim­i­lar names, these cour­ses present a range of pos­si­ble ca­reer path­ways in the elec­tri­cal field and be­yond.

Here are some pri­vate in­sti­tu­tions that pro­vide elec­tri­cal en­gi­neer­ing cour­ses in Malaysia. Course ti­tle (full-time)

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) in Elec­tri­cal & Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) in Elec­tri­cal & Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) in Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) in Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing with spe­cial­ism in In­for­ma­tion Tech­nol­ogy

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing in Elec­tron­ics - Com­puter and In­for­ma­tion En­gi­neer­ing (Hons)

Bach­e­lor of Elec­tron­ics En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours)

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) in Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) in Elec­tri­cal & Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of Elec­tron­ics En­gi­neer­ing (Com­mu­ni­ca­tion) (Hons)

Cy­ber­jaya cam­pus

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tri­cal Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Com­puter

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Nan­otech­nol­ogy

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Mi­crowave and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Op­ti­cal En­gi­neer­ing

Me­laka cam­pus

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Ro­bot­ics and Au­toma­tion

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tron­ics ma­jor­ing in Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing in Elec­tri­cal and Com­puter Sys­tems En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tron­ics En­gi­neer­ing (Hons)

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) Elec­tronic and Elec­tri­cal En­gi­neer­ing (Dual Award)

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) in Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tronic) (Hon­ours) Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tron­ics

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Com­mu­ni­ca­tion and Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing with Hon­ours (Elec­tri­cal)

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) Elec­tri­cal Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) Elec­tron­ics

Bach­e­lor of Elec­tri­cal Power En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) Bach­e­lor of Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tron­ics En­gi­neer­ing (Hons)

Sun­gai Long cam­pus

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tronic and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions En­gi­neer­ing

Kam­par cam­pus

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hon­ours) Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing (Hons) Elec­tri­cal and Elec­tronic En­gi­neer­ing

Stu­dents of MIU will be ex­posed to soft skills in ad­di­tion to the­o­ret­i­cal knowl­edge at this green univer­sity.

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