I per­son­ally learned about sex through...

Time Out Malaysia Kids - - Learning -

a more ‘worldly’ class­mate. I was sit­ting in a science lab; legs spread apart and just hap­pened to be sit­ting at the cor­ner of the ta­ble. The class­mate ex­claimed, ‘Ewww! Do you want it that bad?’ I was maybe 12 and a half, in Form One, never had any sex-ed, and I didn't know what she thought I wanted. She prob­a­bly didn't know ei­ther, but this piqued my in­ter­est. Af­ter that, I bought books about pu­berty and learnt about it on my own (my mum was al­ways cool about books) and a cool aunt bought me some books from the States, which I still have and of­ten re­visit when­ever I teach.

‘Popek-Popek’s very first episode...

was about what it re­ally means to ‘lose’ your vir­gin­ity. Most of the girls I've spo­ken to are ob­sessed with vir­gin­ity. It tells you a lot about our so­ci­ety where young women think that their en­tire self-worth is lo­cated be­tween their legs. When I de­cided to do ‘Popek’, I told my­self I would never com­pro­mise on do­ing the right thing, even if it meant the risking the wrath of the con­ser­va­tives (some­thing so many peo­ple in our so­ci­ety seem ter­ri­fied of). The right thing in this case is to pro­vide med­i­cally­ac­cu­rate in­for­ma­tion, which is what we do. We of­ten speak openly about top­ics no one wants to talk about.

The pro­gram of­ten negates sex­ual su­per­sti­tions, such as...

the idea that women are dirty dur­ing their pe­ri­ods; Satan sniffs your un­washed pads; only men get HIV; it’s a man's re­spon­si­bil­ity to make the first move. Se­ri­ously there are so many, I can't re­mem­ber them all right now. Suf­fice to say, we have a ton of work ahead of us.

The anatom­i­cally ac­cu­rate cos­tumes on

the show...

serve to ed­u­cate and de­sen­si­tise peo­ple to­wards gen­i­talia to cre­ate a sex pos­i­tive so­ci­ety.

My co-host Su­dar­shan...

is in­cred­i­bly tal­ented, de­spite not say­ing much on the show. He makes amaz­ing mu­sic. Check out soundcloud.com/ su­dar.

The most chal­leng­ing episode to film was...

the one where Su­dar is hang­ing off a cliff in Bukit Tabur in an at­tempt to es­cape a venge­ful lover and I am try­ing to res­cue him from a he­li­copter fly­ing over­head. Stay tuned...

Most view­ers don’t re­alise that...

even if they al­ready know the an­swers to the ques­tions asked on the show, they should still share the videos and try to watch the show with oth­ers (es­pe­cially young peo­ple) to start con­ver­sa­tions on the sub­ject. We share a col­lec­tive re­spon­si­bil­ity to ed­u­cate and keep each other safe.

The most rewarding part of my job is…

be­ing able to pro­vide real help to peo­ple who are des­per­ate and have nowhere else to turn to. There's a lot of dis­in­for­ma­tion out there, es­pe­cially when it comes to the sub­ject of sex – I have no grand plans of chang­ing the world, I just try to de­bunk the myths and help where I can.

Why should par­ents know about your videos?

I al­ways say that par­ents ought to be the first source of sex ed­u­ca­tion, but the re­al­ity is that most par­ents are clue­less when it comes to the sub­ject. The videos are a good start­ing point for con­ver­sa­tions be­tween kids and par­ents. Watch­ing them to­gether builds trust so that kids know they’re able to con­tinue ask­ing their par­ents ques­tions about their sex­ual health at any time. I think the videos also es­tab­lish a stan­dard of sex-ed that par­ents should be aware of. They’re a stark con­trast to the ab­sti­nenceonly ed­u­ca­tion that’s usu­ally avail­able in schools. Ed­u­ca­tion isn’t just for the kids but also for par­ents be­cause we have to work to­gether if we want to re­ally make an im­pact.

The right thing is to pro­vide med­i­cally­ac­cu­rate in­for­ma­tion, which is what we do

Pre­vi­ously streamed through PopTeeVee, ‘Popek-Popek’ now has its own Youtube chan­nel (search for ‘Popek Popek’).

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