Maslow’s Hi­er­ar­chy of Needs

In or­der to ful­fil your full po­ten­tial, a per­son must meet cer­tain re­quire­ments for per­sonal growth. Our res­i­dent psy­chother­a­pist, Rosan Ouw­erk­erk, ex­plains how this ap­plies to your chil­dren

The Playa Times Riviera Maya's English Newspaper - - Beach Life - BY ROSAN OUW­ERK­ERK

Psy­chol­o­gist Abra­ham Maslow stated that peo­ple are mo­ti­vated to achieve cer­tain needs. When one level of needs is ful­filled a per­son seeks to ful­fill the next one, and so on. In this ar­ti­cle, I will dis­cuss Maslow’s Hi­er­ar­chy of Needs (1943), which is of­ten de­picted in a pyra­mid. As well I will ex­plain how each level re­lates to the ed­u­ca­tion of chil­dren.

Phys­i­o­log­i­cal needs

- air, food, drink, shel­ter, warmth, sleep. Th­ese needs are pri­mary; we need them to sur­vive. The de­vel­op­ment of the higher lev­els is im­peded if there is a lack of pri­mary needs. This level rep­re­sents the im­por­tance of reg­u­lar nu­tri­tion and care for chil­dren.

Safety needs -

pro­tec­tion, se­cu­rity, or­der, sta­bil­ity. Ba­sic trust arises if the phys­i­o­log­i­cal and safety needs are ful­filled. Ba­sic trust grows in con­tact with the care­giver (mostly the par­ents) who serves as a nur­tur­ing and car­ing per­son and is the first to rep­re­sent safety. Here lays the foundation of trust in your­self, the peo­ple around you, hu­man­ity, and the world.

Love and be­long­ing needs

friend­ship, in­ti­macy, af­fec­tion and love. Love is based on ac­cep­tance and rec­i­proc­ity and im­plies a healthy in­ti­mate re­la­tion based on trust. We have the so­cial need to con­nect with peo­ple, to be­long to a com­mu­nity. In a child’s life, this level rep­re­sents the im­por­tance of un­con­di­tional love, ac­cep­tance

and a place in the peer group.

Es­teem needs

achieve­ment, mas­tery, in­de­pen­dence, self-re­spect, and the re­spect re­ceived from oth­ers. Ex­pe­ri­ences of suc­cess at school (learn­ing re­sults) and at home (self-de­pen­dency) are cru­cial for fur­ther child de­vel­op­ment.

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Self-ac­tu­al­iza­tion needs -

self-ful­fill­ment, seek­ing per­sonal growth and peak ex­pe­ri­ences. Only if the pre­vi­ous lev­els have been ful­filled, we come to com­plete self-ful­fill­ment. We have no fears that hin­der us; we do not feel re­stricted by com­pe­ti­tion for a place in a group. We feel free from val­u­a­tion or as­sess­ment of oth­ers. Based on the We have the so­cial need to con­nect with peo­ple, to be­long to a com­mu­nity. In a child’s life, this level rep­re­sents the im­por­tance of un­con­di­tional love, ac­cep­tance and a place in the peer group. achieve­ment of self-con­fi­dence, we can de­velop our­selves with­out im­ped­i­ments within our­selves or from out­side. This level would be reached in adult­hood if chil­dren were able to ful­fill the other four lev­els of needs.

Con­cern­ing psy­chother­apy the sec­ond level is cru­cial: lack of safety can be an ob­sta­cle for the rest of our lives. If peo­ple get stuck on this level, they of­ten suf­fer from tremen­dous anx­i­ety. Ther­apy can help to strengthen the ba­sic trust.

Rosan Ouw­erk­erk is a Dutch reg­is­tered psy­chother­a­pist and she runs a pri­vate prac­tice in Playa del Carmen. If you think her help is re­quired, you can con­tact her: rosan.ouw­erk­erk@gmail.com.

When one’s need is met a per­son seeks to ful­fill the next one / Photo: FreeIm­ages

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