Ingo Po­si­tions

The Myanmar Times - Weekend - - Classifieds - NOVEM­BER 10, 2017

THE United Na­tions 2I¿FH RQ 'UXJV DQG Crime (UNODC) is seek­ing (1) Na­tional Pro­gramme Co­or­di­na­tor (SC-9) AC, 1 Post, Ini­tially six months, with a pos­si­bil­ity for ex­ten­sion, Duty Sta­tion: Yan­gon. Re­quire­ments: Bach­e­lor’s or Master’s De­gree in Busi­ness Ad­min­is­tra­tion, Pub­lic Ad­min­is­tra­tion, Eco­nom­ics, Po­lit­i­cal Sciences, So­cial 6FLHQFHV RU UHODWHG ¿HOG A min­i­mum of 4 years of rel­e­vant ex­pe­ri­ence for can­di­dates hold­ing a Bach­e­lor’s De­gree or 2 years of rel­e­vant ex­pe­ri­ence for can­di­dates hold­ing a Master’s de­gree in the man­age­ment of an­ti­cor­rup­tion or rule of law pro­grammes in­clud­ing el­e­ments such as pub­lic re­forms, good gov­er­nance and ca­pac­ity EXLOGLQJ 3UR¿FLHQF\ LQ 06 2I¿FH DSSOLFDWLRQV (Word, Ex­cel, Ac­cess, and Power Point) and pro­gramme man­age­ment soft­ware. Flu­ency in oral and writ­ten English and Myan­mar is es­sen­tial. (2) Tea Ex­ten­sion­ist (SC-6) AD, 1 Post, Ini­tially six months, with a pos­si­bil­ity for ex­ten­sion, Duty Sta­tion: Vil­lage based (Ho­pong/ Loilem), South­ern Shan State. Re­quire­ments: Se­condary Ed­u­ca­tion, Univer­sity De­gree prefer­able in Agri­cul­ture RU UHODWHG ¿HOG EXW LW LV not a re­quire­ment. For Se­condary Ed­u­ca­tion - min­i­mum six years of tech­ni­cal ex­pe­ri­ence, For Univer­sity De­gree hold­ers - min­i­mum three years of tech­ni­cal ex­pe­ri­ence in com­mu­nity par­tic­i­pa­tory plan­ning and im­ple­men­ta­tion of al­ter­na­tive de­vel­op­ment or ru­ral de­vel­op­ment projects is prefer­able. Ex­pe­ri­ence in ex­ten­sion ser­vices, if pos­si­ble in Tea, is con­sid­ered an as­set. Can­di­dates should clearly in­di­cate the Post Ti­tle in their ap­pli­ca­tion. Ap­pli­ca­tion must in­clude a cover let­ter, cur­rent CV, UN P11 Form, copies of rel­e­vant aca­demic TXDOL¿FDWLRQ FHUWL¿FDWHV and a re­cent pass­port sized pho­to­graph. Ap­pli­ca­tion should be ad­dress to UNODC, 11A, May­likha Road, Ward-7, Mayan­gone Town­ship, Yan­gon, Myan­mar. DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1). Gov­ern­ment Li­ai­son, Ac­count­abil­ity and Part­ner Co­or­di­na­tor (1-Post / Yan­gon) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ments at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org & eih­laing. phyo@dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1).Fi­nance Of­fi­cer 1-Post / Bhamo, Kachin State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ments at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01- 524469, 09731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@dr­cmm. org & sen­ghkawn.pan@ dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH Coun­cil look­ing MRE Of¿cer (1-Post/ Lashio, Shan State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ments at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01-524469, 09731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@dr­cmm. org & al­berto.r.serra@ dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is seek­ing(1).cccm Of¿ce As­sis­tant (1Post/sit­twe, Rakhine State)(2).com­plaint Re­sponse Mech­a­nism & Ca­pac­ity Build­ing Of¿cer (1-Post/sit­twe, Rakhine State)(3) CCCM Com­mu­nity Par­tic­i­pa­tion As­sis­tant (1-Post/sit­twe, Rakhine State) (4).Mo­bile Pro­tec­tion As­sis­tant/ Re-an­nounce­ment (3Post/muse, North­ern Shan State) (5) Com­mu­nity Pro­tec­tion As­sis­tant /Rean­nounce­ment (2-Post/ Muse, North­ern Shan State) (6)Com­mu­nity Trainer HMA-MRE/ Re-an­nounce­ment (3-Post/muse, North­ern Shan State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can­re­quest the full job an­nounce­ments at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1) Con­struc­tion Man­ager - 1Post/sit­twe, Rakhine State) (2)Pro­tec­tion As­sis­tant 1 Post / Sit­twe, Rakhine State. In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ment at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org and susu. hlaing@dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1).Lo­gis­tics & Pro­cure­ment As­sis­tant 1 Post/ Sit­twe, Rakhine State. (2).Lo­gis­tics Of¿cer (1Post/sit­twe, Rakhine)(3) Liveli­hood Of¿cer /Rean­nounce­ment (1-Post/ Bhamo, Kachin State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ments at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph: 01524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1).Mine Ac­tion Deputy Pro­gramme Man­ager -1Post/yan­gon & ex­ten­sive travel in Mine Ac­tion Ac­tiv­i­ties) (2). Pro­tec­tion As­sis­tant 2 Post/sit­twe, Rakhine State) (3).Terms of Ref­er­ence Study on &RQÀLFW 6HQVLWLYLW\ LQ Hu­man­i­tar­ian Ac­tion (1-Post/kachin & North­ern Shan State) (4).Terms of Ref­er­ence Study on So­lu­tions for Dis­place­ment in Kachin & North­ern Shan State 1 Post. In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ments at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01 524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for Op­er­a­tions Co­or­di­na­tor 1Post (Bhamo, Kachin State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ment at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01-524469, 09731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@dr­cmm. org & sen­ghkawn.pan@ dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1)CCCM Se­nior As­sess­ment As­sis­tant (6-Post/ Sit­twe, Rakhine State) (2)Deputy Pro­gramme Man­ager (1-Post/ Sit­twe, Rakhine State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ment at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org and kr­ish­nan. james.nair@dr­cmm.org DAN­ISH REFUGEE Coun­cil (INGO) is look­ing for (1).CCCM As­sis­tant /Re-an­nounce­ment (1Post/sit­twe, Rakhine State) (2).Pro­gramme Of­fi­cer (1-Post/ Loikaw, Kayah State) In­ter­ested can­di­dates can re­quest the full job an­nounce­ment at DRC (Yan­gon). Ph : 01524469, 09-731-94161 Email : re­cruit­ment@ dr­cmm.org

SAMOA rugby fans have ral­lied to the aid of their team af­ter warn­ings that the Samoa Rugby Union is in­sol­vent and play­ers may go un­paid for Tests in Europe this month.

A com­bined ra­dio and telethon in Samoa on Wed­nes­day raised $150,000 in a na­tion which has a pop­u­la­tion of less than 200,000 and an av­er­age an­nual house­hold in­come of around $15,000.

The na­tional ap­peal fol­lowed a dire warn­ing from Prime Min­is­ter Tuilaepa Sailele Maliel­e­gaoi that the Samoa Rugby Union is un­able to meet its debts or pay player wages.

Samoa’s Tests against Scot­land to­mor­row and Eng­land and Ro­ma­nia over the fol­low­ing two weeks will go ahead as sched­uled.

The Samoa play­ers and coach Fuimaono Tim­i­taea Ta­fua are likely to be fully paid fol­low­ing the fundrais­ing drive. The Eng­land Rugby Union has also in­di­cated it will make a good­will pay­ment of al­most $100,000 to Samoa to help meet play­ers’ match fees.

Eng­land’s Rugby Foot­ball Union of­fered a sim­i­lar “good­will” amount to Fiji ahead of a Test at Twick­en­ham last year from which it re­ceived an es­ti­mated $13.1 mil­lion. Rugby’s rev­enue-shar­ing sys­tem, which al­lows ma­jor na­tions such as Eng­land to re­tain all rev­enues from home matches, has been strongly crit­i­cised by Samoa and other Pa­cific Is­land na­tions.

Be­cause those na­tions rarely play at home and gen­er­ate lit­tle in­come when they do — a re­sult of small sta­di­ums and nec­es­sar­ily low ticket prices, lack of broad­cast­ing rights and con­se­quent spon­sor­ship — there is a sig­nif­i­cant wealth gap be­tween rugby’s rich­est and poor­est na­tional unions.

Samoa has been known for its abil­ity to com­pete on the field with top-tier na­tions: it qual­i­fied for ev­ery Rugby World Cup bar the first in 1987, beat­ing Wales in pool play in 1991. But it has been elim­i­nated in the pool stages of ev­ery Cup since 2003 and its in­di­vid­ual Test re­sults in re­cent years have been poor.

Al­most all of its top play­ers are based in Aus­tralia, New Zealand, Ja­pan, Bri­tain or Europe and their avail­abil­ity for Test matches is of­ten con­strained by the de­mands of their clubs. At the same time many young Samoan play­ers make them­selves avail­able to rep­re­sent the All Blacks, Eng­land or other teams be­cause the fi­nan­cial re­wards are much greater.

Heavy­weight hype packs a new punch

AN­THONY Joshua woke up on Wed­nes­day to find him­self more of a wanted man than ever in box­ing’s en­ter­tain­ing new era of old-fash­ioned heavy­weight hoopla and in­trigue.

The Bri­ton is at the heart of a long-over­due heavy­weight re­vival, the money-spin­ning fo­cus for three other un­beaten cham­pi­ons who, like him, be­lieve they can unify the divi­sion and be­come undis­puted owner of the sport’s most pres­ti­gious ti­tle.

Joshua, who holds the WBA and IBF ver­sions of the crown, was called out by both Amer­ica’s WBC heavy­weight cham­pion Deon­tay Wilder and New Zealand’s Joseph Parker, the WBO holder, on Wed­nes­day as the hype re­ally be­gan to take hold.

The pair both see a fight with Bri­tain’s 2012 Olympic cham­pion as their pass­port to global su­per­star­dom while in the back­ground an­other Bri­ton, Tyson Fury, the un­beaten for­mer three­belt holder, still keeps trum­pet­ing his claims too.

Be­tween them the quar­tet have had more than 100 pro­fes­sional fights and not lost one. So some­thing has to give once, as seems in­evitable in 2018, box­ing sees the first punches thrown in a bid to find the first undis­puted champ since the WBO was founded in 1988.

It is all a far cry from the fairly stag­nant decade dur­ing which Wladimir Kl­itschko ruled the divi­sion with me­chan­i­cal ef­fi­ciency. Once beaten by Fury and Joshua, though, the Ukrainian’s era was con­signed to history.

The chis­elled Joshua’s per­fect 20-fight, 20-knock-out record, al­lied to a per­son­al­ity that has turned him into the poster boy of the divi­sion, has given him a pro­file that puts his camp in the driv­ing seat for big fight ne­go­ti­a­tions.

Yet his po­ten­tial chal­lengers, en­cour­aged by how Joshua made hard work in dis­pos­ing of tough late re­place­ment Car­los Takam in his last de­fence, are now ramp­ing up the noise as they jos­tle for po­si­tion to face the 28-year-old.

PO­TEN­TIAL FIGHTS Wilder, whose one-round de­mo­li­tion of Ber­mane Stiverne in New York on Satur­day took his blem­ish-free record to 38 knock-outs in 39 wins, de­liv­ered a taunt­ing mes­sage on so­cial me­dia, declar­ing he would beat Joshua in his Bri­tish “safe haven”.

“You know I’m com­ing for you... 2018 is what you should be worried about. The peo­ple want it. Do you want it? Or do you have some hid­den agen­das? Are you hid­ing any­thing? We’re on it so you ei­ther fight or shut up,” boomed the 32-year-old in clas­sic trash-talk­ing fash­ion.

Joshua’s pro­moter Ed­die Hearn had pro­posed Wilder should face an­other Bri­ton, Dil­lian Whyte, a for­mer Joshua vic­tim, be­fore any po­ten­tial match, leav­ing the Amer­i­can to growl: “A king doesn’t chase the peas­ants, a king takes on kings.”

On Wed­nes­day, though, Hearn told Sky Sports that ne­go­ti­a­tions with Wilder’s rep­re­sen­ta­tives over a po­ten­tial fight with the Amer­i­can would now be­gin next week. – Reuters

Chung takes new rules in his stride

SOUTH Korea’s Chung Hyeon main­tained his 100 per­cent record at the Next Gen ATP Fi­nals with a crush­ing vic­tory over Rus­sian An­drey Rublev on Wed­nes­day to surge ahead in Group A.

Just as he did on Tues­day, the 21-year-old showed a lik­ing for the var­i­ous new in­no­va­tions be­ing tested out in Mi­lan as he proved too solid for Rublev – the high­est ranked player in the ATP’S new show­case event for the best play­ers aged 21 and un­der.

World num­ber 54 Chung won 4-0 4-1 4-3(1) to fol­low up his de­feat of Cana­dian De­nis Shapo­valov – seal­ing a semi-fi­nal place with one round-robin match to spare.

Chung fin­ished off Rublev in just over an hour, slightly longer than it took Karen Khachanov to beat Amer­i­can Jared Donaldson 4-1 4-3(2) 4-2 in Group B.

Donaldson is still with­out a set af­ter two matches.

The 18-year-old Shapo­valov notched his first win when he beat Ital­ian wild­card Gian­luigi Quinzi 4-1 4-1 3-4(5) 4-3(5).

Shapo­valov, ranked 51st, raced through the open­ing two sets against his fel­low for­mer ju­nior Wim­ble­don cham­pion be­fore the match burst into life when the Ital­ian found an­other gear.

De­spite dou­ble-fault­ing on match point, how­ever, Shapo­valov claimed vic­tory and will need to beat Rublev to reach the semis.

The eight-man tour­na­ment, show­cas­ing the play­ers who are tipped to be the fu­ture of men’s ten­nis, is us­ing rad­i­cal new rules aimed at in­creas­ing the pop­u­lar­ity of the sport. – Reuters

An­thony Joshua cel­e­brates his vic­tory against Car­los Takam in Cardiff, Wales, last month, which landed him the IBF & WBA world heavy­weight ti­tles. Photo: Reuters

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