A good Knight, amid the Bay­hem

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gives Wahlberg some­thing to do ex­cept look angsty and get beaten up. Wahlberg is too of­ten cast as some sort of cut-rate Matt Damon sub­sti­tute, but he has su­perb comic tim­ing when it’s called for and he drops a cou­ple of lines that bring the house down here, usu­ally di­rected against pint-sized and glee­fully so­cio­pathic ro­bot but­ler Cog­man, voiced – hi­lar­i­ously – by Down­ton Abbey’s Jim Carter.

The Last Knight is an unashamedly daft film. It chucks in plot points from In­de­pen­dence Day, The Da Vinci Code and

Na­tional Trea­sure, takes de­sign cues – ac­knowl­edged – from Star Wars and Robo­cop, while ref­er­enc­ing True Ro­mance, Blade Run­ner and Scar­face among count­less oth­ers. I’m pretty sure there’s a sly dig at Ri­d­ley Scott’s overblown and zero-fun

Prometheus in there as well.

Maybe The Last Knight got me at the right time. On another day that numb­ing run­ning time and Bay’s le­gendary in­abil­ity to show any woman with­out ob­jec­ti­fy­ing her, or any non-white char­ac­ter with­out mak­ing them a car­i­ca­ture, might have been enough to make me dis­like this film quite a lot. But tonight it seems to me that with The Last Knight, Bay has re­lo­cated the fran­chise’s mojo. It’s a fun watch. And right now, that’ll do. –

Graeme Tuck­ett

Trans­form­ers: The Last Knight fi­nally gives Mark Wahlberg some­thing to do ex­cept look angsty and get beaten up.

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