Come Down Se­lec­tor

Black Magazine - - Contents -

Yasmine Gan­ley: How do you feel your sales ex­pe­ri­ence has and will help with El­liott? Gabrielle El­liott: I guess hav­ing con­fi­dence and knowl­edge inside the in­dus­try, in terms of mar­ket and price point. Also, hav­ing re­al­is­tic ex­pec­ta­tions, the fash­ion in­dus­try can be cruel and fickle. I def­i­nitely feel I am pre­pared for which ever di­rec­tion El­liott takes me, for the best and the worst! I love the sound of th­ese gifted heir­loom pieces from your Mum! Tell me more!? My one ‘life piece’ that I would be lost with­out is my ‘Peace Dove Pen­dant’ gifted to me by my mother in my late teens. Made by Auck­land based jew­eller Peter Min­turn it was a limited edi­tion sil­ver pen­dant to mark the in­au­gu­ral In­ter­na­tional Wom­ens Day in New Zealand dur­ing the 1970s. For me it rep­re­sents a time in my mother's life, and in my coun­try, of great sig­nif­i­cance. It is a sym­bol that is min­i­mal in its de­sign but stands for so much. I wear this neck­lace every­day, I am naked with out it. Your de­signs are de­scribed as ‘un­der­stated’ which is said to re­flect your own style. Why did you de­cide to cre­ate un­der­stated pieces rather than chunky and bold jew­ellery? And, what in­flu­ences you? I like the idea of jew­ellery be­ing an adorn­ment of the body, a part of it rather than ‘on it’ as such. I think this is why I also re­ally love the tar­nish­ing and mark­ings you get from cer­tain met­als when worn over a pe­riod of time. Each per­son’s chem­i­cal make-up is dif­fer­ent and that’s also true of met­als, when they meet they have their own re­ac­tion and re­la­tion­ship to each other, even their own smell on the skin. I find it in­trigu­ing. In terms of my own style - less is more. It’s taken me a while to be­come com­fort­able with this. My in­flu­ences come from my day-to-day ad­mi­ra­tion I have for other peo­ple's aes­thetic and how they put pieces to­gether. I take in what peo­ple are wear­ing around me all the time, work­ing in the fash­ion in­dus­try it just in­grains it in you! De­scribe the El­liott wearer? Girl, boy, if the ring fits, WEAR IT! I see from your In­sta­gram that you have a mas­sive ap­pre­ci­a­tion for cars. Tell us about this, your spe­cial cars and the ul­ti­mate ‘drive’? There have been three cars of sig­nif­i­cance in my life; my Papa Rogers 1973 Ford Fal­con Lux­ury V8, my Papa Nicks 1974 Holden Kingswood V8 ute, and my very first car, ‘ Au­d­ina’ an ‘86 Audi Coupe that had a straight 5. Since I can re­mem­ber, my fa­ther took me along to the saloons at Western Springs, then in my teenage years down south the V8’s and 6’s were ev­ery­where, all the time, and then on to the beau­ti­ful ‘Au­d­ina’ who was and al­ways will be my #1!! The ul­ti­mate drive? The Delorean DMC-12. Even just be­ing able to lick the bon­net of one of them would be epic!! Does this fascination with cars leak into your jew­ellery de­signs at all? I think now that I have been asked this ques­tion prob­a­bly yes, it does a lot. My pre­ferred body of a car tends to­wards the sleek and an­gu­lar: Fer­rari, Maserati, Lo­tus and Audi su­per cars that were in­tro­duced mid 70s - 80s. I have mas­sive ap­pre­ci­a­tion for whats un­der the hood, but mostly it’s the visual aes­thetic. Tell us about the idea of us­ing raw met­als to al­low for nat­u­ral tar­nish­ing? I have ex­pe­ri­enced raw metal with a lot of my ‘60s & ‘70s jew­ellery, cop­per pieces par­tic­u­larly. I do how­ever see it mak­ing a come­back and tar­nish­ing be­ing ac­cept­able again with the growth of the jew­ellery in­dus­try at present. You love and follow the works of jew­ellers like Peter Min­turn, Hans & Karl Hansen. What is it about th­ese jew­ellers that you love? Those de­sign­ers have a dif­fer­ent aes­thetic yet fo­cus on metal and shape to give their pieces move­ment and stature with­out the need to add in many pre­cious stones. I see their work be­ing more fo­cused on the metal and how they can ma­nip­u­late it to adorn the body. I love your cat ears-shaped de­sign ta­ble! Tell us more about your work­ing en­vi­ron­ment - de­sign rit­u­als, mu­sic you like to lis­ten to? I'm a bit cray on cats, just like cars they have al­ways been in my life from child­hood. When I was build­ing my work bench I wanted it to be a larger sim­pli­fied ver­sion of the tra­di­tional style jew­ellers bench that I could use as a plat­form for not only smithing but also the de­sign process too. The cat came to me as the ad­verse to the tra­di­tional arc shaped jew­ellers ta­bles. Ini­tially I thought it wasn’t such a good idea tech­ni­cally speak­ing but I just went with it any­way. It has ac­tu­ally turned out to be su­per good for lever­age while fil­ing and saw­ing so it was worth the doubt! Mu­sic wise, I’m still miss­ing 95BFM since leav­ing Auck­land 4-years-ago and I stream it almost al­ways. If I’m need­ing to be grounded it’s Rit­ual De Lo Ha­bit­ual ~ Jane’s Ad­dic­tion - that al­ways gets me where I need to be.

AFTER A CA­REER WITH SOME OF NEW ZEALAND'S LEAD­ING FASH­ION HOUSES, MEL­BOURNE-BASED GABRIELLE EL­LIOTT, WAS IN­SPIRED TO RE­TURN TO HER DE­SIGN ROOTS, AS A JEW­ELLER. YASMINE GAN­LEY LEARNS ABOUT EL­LIOTT THE LA­BEL, AND THE RE­LEASE OF HER FIRST READY-TO-WEAR, SCULP­TURAL JEW­ELLERY COL­LEC­TION PHOTO: KELLY THOMP­SON

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