COL­LEC­TIVE FORCE

BLKonBLK - - Collective Force -

IN A WHIRL­WIND SIX MONTHS, 17-YEAR-OLD JULIE AN­DER­SON WENT FROM HER RE­STRIC­TIVE HOME LIFE AS A CEN­TRAL FLORIDA TEEN TO THE COVER Of COS­MOPOLI­TAN. IN THE EN­SU­ING YEARS SHE WOULD GO ON TO A FUR­THER 30-ODD COV­ERS, BE­COME THE IN­CUM­BENT LA PERLA GIRL, SHOOT WITH SOME Of THE GREATS, HAVE CHIL­DREN AND TRAVEL THE GLOBE WITH SAID CHIL­DREN. THEN SHE MET BLACK MAG ED­I­TORAT-LARGE AND PHO­TOG­RA­PHER PAUL EMPSON, AND THE REST IS HIS­TORY. JULIE TALKS TO GRANT FELL AND RACHAEL CHURCH­WARD ABOUT MOD­ELS, MOMS, FEM­I­NINE COL­LEC­TIVE, OUR RACH AND TYRA Pho­tog­ra­phy: Paul EMPSON Fash­ion Ed­i­tor: SAMRANGER Hair: Kuni at See Man­age­ment NY Make-up: marke­dio at See Man­age­ment NY Model: Julie AN­DER­SON at LA Mod­els

Grant Fell: Let’s start at the be­gin­ning Julie, when and where did your mod­el­ling ca­reer start? Julie An­der­son: It started in Cen­tral Florida in 1987, and it’s ac­tu­ally a mir­a­cle that it started at all. I was raised as a Je­ho­vah’s Wit­ness. I don’t know if you are fa­mil­iar with that re­li­gion, but it’s pretty re­stric­tive. Any­thing that in­volved the out­side world, re­la­tion­ships with non mem­bers of the church, lis­ten­ing to cer­tain mu­sic, go­ing on a date with­out the in­ten­tion of mar­riage, or be­ing in­volved in after school ac­tiv­i­ties were frowned upon by the el­ders of the church—not a nor­mal child­hood filled with rel­a­tively harm­less ex­pe­ri­ences. Right? GF: For sure… When I en­tered high school, in 9th grade, I crawled into a shell. I had two or three good friends. One of my friends would al­ways bring in fash­ion mag­a­zines. One day she brought in Cos­mopoli­tan mag­a­zine with Paulina on the cover … Paulina Porizkova? Ex­actly. I re­mem­ber look­ing at her and think­ing, my eyes are kind of like hers, and my neck is kind of like hers. I al­ways felt awk­ward, ugly, and didn’t fit in any­where. Then, I heard on the ra­dio about an Elite Mod­el­ing com­pe­ti­tion hap­pen­ing in Or­lando. My par­ents took me to that com­pe­ti­tion—a bold move. The uni­verse stepped in, and my des­tiny was changed for­ever. I was courted by agen­cies around the world, but I had never been away from home be­fore. I de­cided to go to Chicago first. It seemed less daunt­ing than New York or Europe. I was only sev­en­teen. When I ar­rived in Chicago, I was lucky enough to work straight away with the great Vic­tor Skreb­neski. He launched Cindy Craw­ford’s ca­reer. His photographs are iconic, old school—fab­u­lous. Shortly there­after I se­cured my first ma­jor book­ing with Amer­i­can Vogue. I went from small town Amer­ica to Vogue mag­a­zine. Wayne Maser was the pho­tog­ra­pher for that shoot. Kara Young, a su­per­model in my eyes was my buddy on the shoot. I re­mem­ber walk­ing in and see­ing Polly Mellen, do you know who Polly Mellen is? Rachael Church­ward: Ab­so­lutely! She was the stylist on that shoot. RC: Wow, my hero! … She took one look at my arms and said “Her arms are too hairy!” I was im­me­di­ately shut­tled off to get my arms waxed. It was hys­ter­i­cal. I was this doe-eyed kid. I re­mem­ber Wayne Maser sug­gest­ing that Kara and I act like les­bians, and I ac­tu­ally had no idea what a les­bian was! Gf&rc:ha­haha… Shortly after my ca­reer took off in NYC, I met a man who rocked my world. How­ever, the in­doc­tri­na­tion of my youth was still in­grained in my head, and be­ing in a se­ri­ous re­la­tion­ship with­out the seal of a mar­riage cer­tifi­cate both­ered me. I ended up get­ting mar­ried at a very early age, al­ready preg­nant with my first child. The in­dus­try frowned upon both my union and the im­pend­ing birth of my child. They said it would ruin my ca­reer … GF: It ob­vi­ously didn’t … No. But I was al­ways very stub­born and head­strong, I did what I wanted to do, which def­i­nitely made it harder, but I had an epic ad­ven­ture. Even though my mar­riage didn’t last, I was blessed with an in­cred­i­ble son who trav­elled all over the world with me. GF: It seems the fash­ion in­dus­try views things a bit dif­fer­ently now. Karl Lager­feld made a fea­ture of NZ model Ash­leigh Good’s preg­nancy in the lat­est Chanel show … When I was preg­nant, Tyen pho­tographed me be­fore and after for Bri­tish Vogue. I am pretty sure I was one of the first peo­ple ever to be pub­lished in a ma­jor mag­a­zine com­pletely nude and preg­nant. I just cov­ered my nip­ples. After that, Demi Moore fa­mous Van­ity Fair cover hit the stands. GF: I was go­ing to ask if that was pre the fa­mous Demi Moore cover… Oh, she prob­a­bly got the idea from us …(laughs) … so any­way, yes, that’s how I started. GF: We have been through a bit of a list of pho­tog­ra­phers you have worked with and the list is out­ra­geous; Pa­trick De­marche­lier, Irv­ing Penn, Ave­don, Gilles Ben­si­mon, Hel­mut New­ton, Arthur El­gort, Bert Stern, Al­bert Wat­son, Tyen … leg­endary names … any anec­dotes? I have one that just popped into my mind with Al­bert Wat­son. His pho­to­graphic eye is ex­quis­ite, and his stu­dio was some­thing else. At the en­trance to his studie, a 20 foot high an­gel floated in his court­yard. It had been brought in with a crane. That An­gel al­ways had our backs. Al­bert was very kind … in­tense. I re­mem­ber him show­ing me images as they came out of the dark­room—those were the days when you ac­tu­ally had a dark room! Ev­ery­thing has changed so much … I loved that about Al­bert, he was in­clu­sive. Gf:what about Ave­don? Ave­don shot Estelle Le­fevre and me on the same day for a Vogue cover try. That was so in­tim­i­dat­ing. Be­ing in the same room as Estelle was surreal, she was one of my idols. Me, a kid from nowhere who found her­self in this cre­ative ge­nius at­mos­phere—ave­don’s world—was too much to bear! I re­mem­ber feel­ing like I was un­der a mi­cro­scope. Frankly, I did not feel like I be­longed. Ave­don struck me as some­one who was very math­e­mat­i­cal in his ap­proach to cap­tur­ing an im­age. Clin­i­cal almost. He was fo­cused. GF: Was Irv­ing Penn sim­i­lar? That was in­tense. He was such an unas­sum­ing man, very gen­tle. Some­one told me once that he didn’t sleep more than four hours in a night. He was in­sanely cre­ative with a great team around him who sup­ported and pro­tected him. You could cer­tainly never ques­tion any­thing he asked you to do. If he wanted you to put dog poo on your face for a photo you had to do it (laughs). In­evitably, the photo was al­ways a master­piece. GF: On your per­sonal web­site you have around 30 cov­ers, do you have a favourite cover or one that stands out for you? I think the Cos­mopoli­tan cover, my first cover. Me, the geek that was never in­vited any­where, leaves town with­out farewell and turns up six months later on the cover of Cos­mopoli­tan - that was pretty spe­cial. Things moved pretty quickly once that cover came out. There were a lot of in­vi­ta­tions to the high school prom after that! GF & RC: Ha ha, we bet there was! You worked with leg­endary make-up artist Kevyn Au­coin as well, right? Yes. After Kevyn Au­coin did my make-up, I would keep it on for as long as pos­si­ble. I once did a shoot with him in NYC and I said, make sure it sticks be­cause I am go­ing to a party tonight, in Los An­ge­les! When I got off that air­plane in Los An­ge­les, some 6 hours later, my face was still on! RC: Ha ha that’s bril­liant… Look­ing back though, at that Cos­mopoli­tan cover, I was way too thin, But now, the girls in the in­dus­try, look at them … can you be­lieve the girls on the run­way now? RC: One of the prob­lems is that half of them are about 12-years-old…gf: And shipped, en masse, from Rus­sia …RC: … and phys­i­cally un­der­de­vel­oped … and, un­for­tu­nately, in those fash­ion cap­i­tals there is an el­e­ment of be­ing en­cour­aged to be far too thin … It’s ridicu­lous. When Paul and I were in New York, last fash­ion week, I was gob­s­macked…

“THE GEEK THAT WAS NEVER IN­VITED ANY­WHERE LEAVES TOWN AND SIX MONTHS LATER IS ON THE COVER Of COS­MOPOLI­TAN, THAT WAS PRETTY SPE­CIAL. THINGS CHANGED PRETTY QUICKLY WHEN THAT COVER CAME OUT, THERE WERE LOTS Of IN­VI­TA­TIONS TO THE PROM!”

“I AR­RIVED FOR THE GO SEE WITH MY YOUNG SON, A NANNY AND A MENAGERIE Of AN­I­MALS. I STEPPED OUT Of THE CAB, LOOKED UP AND LOCKED EYES WITH PAUL. WE BOTH SWEAR THAT CUPID SHOT HIS AR­ROW THAT DAY. LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT”

RC: We are quite lucky here in New Zealand, where body shape, in gen­eral, is a lit­tle more healthy. We have a healthy life­style here: the food and ex­er­cise is part of life and, gen­er­ally speak­ing, we pre­fer health­ier look­ing girls. Some­times girls come through here, en route to Aus­tralia or even to do a stint in New Zealand, and they have just done fash­ion week up there and they are quite of­ten just skin and bones … The pres­sure is in­sane, th­ese girls are swal­low­ing cot­ton balls. RC: I think it is mainly built around run­way, the girls that get to your level have to be health­ier, they can’t be su­per skinny. The girls we have on our cov­ers, for ex­am­ple, they can be lean, but they have to be health­ier than the run­way girls you are talk­ing about … those are the job­bing mod­els, the ones that are nei­ther here nor there. They book shows some­times but are not re­ally get­ting much at­ten­tion … Yes, that’s the curse of the in­dus­try. Even somebody like my­self that has en­joyed quite a few highs in my ca­reer, I still suf­fered ex­treme self-worth is­sues. I never re­ally felt that good about my­self right up un­til I would say about two years ago. Even with the cam­paigns and ev­ery­thing, I still had huge doubts. My con­fi­dence was very low. You are right when you say that it takes a lit­tle more to be suc­cess­ful nowa­days in fash­ion. There are a lot of mod­els at the top right now who look great but who do not live healthy life­styles. They have a team of peo­ple telling them they look phe­nom­e­nal, but in the long run they are not re­ally in­ter­ested in their ac­tual health and well be­ing. Mod­els are a com­mod­ity. I find it re­mark­ably sad and re­ally heart-wrench­ing. RC: I do feel lucky be­ing here in NZ. It is a small place and Grant and I and our Black teams, we re­ally, re­ally nur­ture the mod­els. They are the kids we never had, and we see it as re­ally im­por­tant that they feel safe and se­cure… There is stress on the mod­els through­out the high fash­ion cap­i­tals, but the worst place, in my opin­ion, in terms of stress placed on mod­els, is Ja­pan. The Ja­panese aes­thetic for beauty is ex­treme. I agree with you about New Zealand. A phe­nom­e­nal coun­try where its cit­i­zens are loving, fam­ily-ori­ented and truly hu­man—em­brac­ing life and all its glory. In all my trav­els, it’s just so rare. GF: One of the high­lights of your mod­el­ing ca­reer must have been your role as the global face and body of La Perla, for five years. What an in­cred­i­ble brand with a rich his­tory … five years in a row. They kept com­ing back to you … They were the best. I was work­ing with a man named Nadir and his wife Alexan­dra and for some rea­son they just loved me. I was con­stantly booked for La Perla. We did shoots in Lake Como, Mi­lano and Paris. It was off-the-charts fab­u­lous. I mean that’s an in­vest­ment you want to make! Ev­ery woman should buy her­self some La Perla un­der­wear (laughs).with­my­ca­reer­sky­rock­et­ing,ithink, at that point, I turned into a bit of a diva. I be­gan re­quest­ing to be flown to Paris via the Con­corde, and they obliged. They were dream clients. GF: Wow, the Con­corde, what a plane! It was in­sane! The Con­corde, first of all, was a ma­jes­tic bird wasn’t it? Be­ing able to cross the At­lantic in 3-and-a-half hours was a dream! GF: In the nineties, at one point you were of­fi­cially des­ig­nated as a su­per­model … Ap­par­ently, I was. I don’t re­ally like that term; I think it’s kind of cheesy. The real su­per­mod­els are ob­vi­ously Kate Moss, Naomi Camp­bell, Christy Turling­ton, Cindy Craw­ford, Linda Evan­ge­lista—we know who they are. I find it em­bar­rass­ing when I am called a su­per­model. The ti­tle does not be­long to me. GF: You had this huge mod­el­ling ca­reer, which ta­pered off a lit­tle around the mil­len­nium, that was when you came to Aus­tralia. In 2001, we gave Amer­ica the big flick be­cause of po­lit­i­cal rea­sons and our ad­dic­tion to travel, next stop, Aus­tralia. In the early 2000s, I was rais­ing three kids, liv­ing in Syd­ney. I re­ally just didn’t worry about my ca­reer any­more. I was fo­cused on be­ing a mom. After hav­ing my youngest child Jalen, I re­al­ized that I missed the fash­ion business. I missed meet­ing peo­ple from dif­fer­ent walks of life, and trav­el­ing to ex­otic lo­ca­tions. I LOVE it! RC: I do too …GF: Same … And that spir­i­tual con­nec­tion thing, you meet some­one and think “my God, we must have been sep­a­rated at birth, you must be a dis­tant rel­a­tive.” GF: What about your hus­band Paul, who is the pho­tog­ra­pher in this story. Tell us about the time when you met Paul … Okay. Well, as you know, you are only as good as your last tear sheet in this business. It’s bru­tal. When Kate Moss came on the scene—all of a sud­den peo­ple had to lose a thou­sand pounds, cut their hair and embrace grunge. I jumped on that band­wagon as well. Cut my hair off and dyed it var­i­ous col­ors. Do­ing any­thing it took to look grunge. I needed new pho­tos for my port­fo­lio, and fast! For­tu­nately, I ran into my friend Alexan­der Becker, a make up artist. He showed me his port­fo­lio and some of his pic­tures blew my mind. I asked him who shot those images and he said Paul Empson. So I said, (adopts diva voice) “Tell Paul I would like him to take my pic­ture.” (laughs). It turns out Paul knew who I was. … Ap­par­ently, he had seen me at par­ties and thought I was a diva. He told Alexan­der that he was not in­ter­ested in shoot­ing me. As luck would have it, shortly there­after, he had a shoot where the lead model was based on John Tra­volta in Satur­day Night Fever. At the last minute, the model that was booked for the shoot pulled out. Paul re­mem­bered that I wanted to work with him. He thought my face struc­ture would fit the an­drog­yny look that the shoot re­quired. He took a chance and ar­ranged a meet­ing with me. I ar­rived for the go see with my young son, a nanny and a menagerie of an­i­mals. I stepped out of the cab, looked up and locked eyes with Paul. We both swear that cupid shot his ar­row that day. Love at first sight … G&r:awwww… GF: Let’s talk about where you are at now and Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive, your web­site. We re­ally like the site … Re­ally? You are not just say­ing that? RC: No. Re­ally, we like it a lot …good mes­sages! Just yes­ter­day, I was talk­ing to a suc­cess­ful Aus­tralian model and she said to me, “Julie, I’m 36 years old, and it’s hard to work. I don’t un­der­stand, we’re not old!” Per­son­ally speak­ing, we are just now feel­ing bet­ter about our­selves, but the in­dus­try tells us we are not sexy any­more. Like you men­tioned ear­lier Rachel, most me­dia for women over 35 is bor­ing as hell. Re­sign­ing our­selves to a ma­tronly per­sona, at this point, is re­ally all that is avail­able to us, in my opin­ion. That’s just not where I am at. For­get it! RC: It’s not over. Just be­cause you hit 30, 40 or 50, there are a whole bunch of new things to be ex­cited about! In Aus­tralia I started work­ing again, I did a few com­mer­cials, a few spreads and cam­paigns there. I had fun, but mainly I was still just a mom. I think in the South­ern Hemi­sphere be­ing a mother is very im­por­tant. It’s val­ued and re­spected. You don’t feel like a loser.

In Amer­ica, moth­er­hood is not deemed as im­por­tant as hav­ing a high pro­file ca­reer. The bar is set in­cred­i­bly high. As I emerged from be­ing just a mom, I started search­ing for my pas­sion. I thought about go­ing back to school but then it dawned on me that by the time I would have fin­ished and paid off the stu­dent loans, I would have been 75, you know?! (laughs). So, when we re­turned to the North­ern Hemi­sphere, I re­con­nected with all of the peo­ple I had lost con­tact with. All of a sud­den, after all of th­ese years, I had this net­work, this in­cred­i­ble net­work, of in­sanely fab­u­lous women and men. There where a hand­ful who helped bring me back to my for­mer coura­geous self, helped me con­quer my in­ner demons if you will. They said “Julie, c’mon, you feel like that? Look at you, you look amaz­ing!” And then I thought to my­self, “Jeez, if I feel like this, there must be other women out there who feel just like I do.” GF: Was that the gen­e­sis for Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive? Yeah. I started think­ing that it would be great to tap into this amaz­ing group of women that I know, from the fash­ion, mu­sic, and en­ter­tain­ment in­dus­tries. Peo­ple with their ex­pe­ri­ences, their back­grounds, who have some­thing pos­i­tive to give back, whether it be a lit­tle make-up tip here or there. Peo­ple who could be bru­tally hon­est about beauty, about life, about ex­pe­ri­ences and tell their sto­ries. For ex­am­ple, be­ing hon­est about al­ways hav­ing a belly is­sue un­til they re­al­ized, “Wait a minute, I have been suck­ing in my belly all my life, right up un­til I was 50. I’m let­ting it go man, I’m in my bathing suit and I feel hot!” Peo­ple need to hear real sto­ries, like the un­sung hero, a lit­tle Chi­nese lady who lives up the road and is al­ways pass­ing food out to the home­less – maybe it would be nice to know about her … all we know about, it seems … are the Kar­dashi­ans (pauses) RC: Oh­god… Imean,c’mon,it­makesme­won­der whatiswrong­with­so­ci­etyand­whythe­world is go­ing to hell in a hand­bag. So, I reached out to per­haps my clos­est, and per­haps first friend in the in­dus­try, Marla Carl­ton. She was an early model buddy in Chicago. When I told her about the Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive idea, she jumped on­board im­me­di­ately. She is an award-win­ning graphic de­signer and art di­rec­tor. My part­ner in crime, we are both ful­fill­ing our dreams, writ­ing and cu­rat­ing for Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive. We launched at the end of Jan­uary, since then it’s been a wild ride, meet­ing in­cred­i­ble peo­ple along the way. Like Michelle Rigby, a bril­liant mind, and the au­thor of our first col­umn, In­spired In­tel is EX-CIA, work­ing un­der­cover for 10 years in the Mid­dle East. She was like me, raised with a re­li­gious, con­ser­va­tive back­ground. In the CIA she lit­er­ally had to go up against ter­ror­ists. As an agent in the mid­dle east, she was a woman in a man’s world, one of the CIA’S se­cret weapons. She has just fin­ished her book, and will be a pub­lished nov­el­ist soon. Her take­away after a decade in the CIA, is with her knowl­edge she can help to em­power both women and girls. She writes bi-monthly, in her ex­clu­sive col­umn for Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive about self-de­fense, ca­reer skills and rel­e­vant news. The CIA reviews and ap­proves all of her ar­ti­cles be­fore they are pub­lished on Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive. I think that that is so cool! GF: I like the way you write on the site Julie, you write with a con­cise, open voice. It is easy to follow and un­der­stand what you are say­ing and think­ing. Thank you! I love what you guys are do­ing too. Black is not your av­er­age fash­ion mag is it?! With Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive, we have had some re­mark­able mo­ments al­ready that have just blown our minds. We have jumped on this mas­sive wave of fe­male em­pow­er­ment, not so much fem­i­nist, but rather em­pow­er­ment that comes from em­brac­ing all of our gifts, fem­i­nine not­with­stand­ing. GF: Ok, now the near fu­ture. Can you tell us about the TV show you are go­ing to be do­ing with New Zealand’s sweet­heart, Rachel Hunter? You know, I had not seen her in­over­twen­tysome­thingyears!mynewa­gent in LA sug­gested I might want to con­sider do­ing a re­al­ity TV show—namely one that was cast­ing at that very mo­ment. Be­ing the new kid on the block in Los An­ge­les, I am al­ways up for a new ad­ven­ture, and by now, my skin is pretty thick! I soon found my­self at Lions Gate, which is, of course, a huge en­ter­tain­ment cor­po­ra­tion. The guy I met there for this cast­ing was the cre­ator of wildly suc­cess­ful re­al­ity shows like Jersey Shore. He’s a great guy and at 31 years old, he is hot shit in this town. Last year, he sold some­thing like 30 tele­vi­sion shows. Any­way, this par­tic­u­lar show is still un­der con­struc­tion. I can’t say too much about it … other than it in­volves mod­el­ing and moth­er­hood. And that is how I was able to rekin­dle my re­la­tion­ship with Rachel. She too was tapped to be in the cast. What­ever hap­pens hap­pens, mean­ing, if could be wildly popular and run for­ever, once launched, or not at all. I can say that go­ing into that meet­ing and find­ing my old friend again, the one and only Rachel Hunter was a gift from the gods! Rachel and I have all kinds of ideas about other po­ten­tial projects and day­dreams of what life should be like. She is a celebrity, a true celebrity that is for sure! The last time I saw her we met at the Chateau Mar­mont, had a bite to eat and called it a night. Leav­ing the Chateau head­ing to my car, she whis­pers “Run!” All of a sud­den Pa­parazzi ap­pear scut­tling around her. I had my hand­bag. I didn’t know if I was sup­posed to pro­tect her, but I am swing­ing it around (much laugh­ing) to cover her face, or to wave it like a weapon in the paps face … it was re­ally odd. I don’t know how I would deal with that celebrity stuff. RC: Oh, I think you would have fun … GF: With your pos­i­tive at­ti­tude to life, I am sure you will … Be­fore we go, I loved the Tyra Banks cover on the last is­sue of Black, can I tell you a Tyra story? RC: Please do! … Ire­mem­ber­tyrawhen she first started. We did the Chanel show to­gether, Tyra was 15 years-old. Her mother was there. She was the pret­ti­est girl in the room. The sweet­est, well-man­nered model around. I re­mem­ber how the divine Miss Naomi Camp­bell, was not happy about Tyra be­ing there. In fact, she was very un­pleas­ant to Tyra. How Tyra han­dled her­self dur­ing what was an un­com­fort­able ex­change was re­mark­able. She was in­cred­i­ble. Look at her now! What a role model. What a re­mark­able suc­cess story. Girl does know how to smize doesn’t she?

Fem­i­nine Col­lec­tive web­site The Julie An­der­son. com

“I STARTED THINK­ING THAT IT WOULD BE GREAT TO TAP INTO THIS AMAZ­ING GROUP Of WOMEN THAT I KNOW, FROM THE FASH­ION, MU­SIC, AND EN­TER­TAIN­MENT IN­DUS­TRIES. PEO­PLE WITH THEIR EX­PE­RI­ENCES, THEIR BACK­GROUNDS, WHO HAVE SOME­THING POS­I­TIVE TO GIVE BACK

open­ing page: Jumper by mar­garethow­ell This page: Jumper by CACHEREL, trousers by mai­son martin margiela, slip­pers by ROBERT CLERG­ERIE

Shirt by TURN­BULL and ASSER, jumper by BERTHOLD

Coat by umit BE­NAN

Jumper by LOU dal­ton, trousers by mai­son martin margiela, shoes by maxmara

Top row left-right: UK Elle 1990 cover, Span­ish Harpers Bazaar cover by Paul Empson, Harpers & Queen cover by Mario Testino This row left-right: Images from Paul and Julie’s first shoot to­gether for Ital­ian Harpers Bazaar

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