Busi­ness fo­cuses on right breath­ing

Central Otago Mirror - - CONVERSATIONS - DASHA KU­PRIENKO

‘‘It's about teach­ing your body how to re­lax. We are so 'go, go go' that it's im­por­tant to get the breath­ing right.’’

Half of the world is breath­ing in­cor­rectly and Glenorchy phys­io­ther­a­pist and pi­lates trainer wants to change that.

Mother of two Emma Fer­ris, 34, says breath­ing tech­niques are re­spon­si­ble for help­ing her get rid of a stut­ter, deal with can­cer in the fam­ily and a di­vorce.

Now she is shar­ing her breath­ing tips world-wide with her Big Ex­hale pro­gramme.

‘‘A lot of it was the con­se­quences of be­ing stressed,’’ she said.

She found that suit­able breath­ing tech­niques changed her physio clients’ well­be­ing and is now tak­ing that fur­ther.

‘‘Heaps of signs were say­ing ‘go and do some­thing on a big level’,’’ she said.

Fer­ris launched an on­line breath­ing course a month ago and now has clients in Ger­many, Amer­ica, Eng­land, Aus­tralia and South­land.

‘‘Go­ing global from down un­der in the South.’’

Med­i­cal re­search showed half of all peo­ple had a form of breath­ing dys­func­tion and about ten per­cent of the pop­u­la­tion suf­fered from a hy­per­ven­ti­la­tion syn­drome.

The syn­drome caused fa­tigue, tin­gling in fin­gers and hands and mus­cle ache, Fer­ris said.

‘‘It’s about teach­ing your body how to re­lax. We are so ‘go, go go’ that it’s im­por­tant to get the breath­ing right.’’

Those who breathe in­cor­rectly all have dif­fer­ent breath­ing pat­terns.

Fer­ris calls them In­flated Ivy, Tense Tom, Chaotic Char­lotte and Low Laura, and the treat­ment de­pends on the type of breather.

‘‘Sorry to all Char­lottes out there,’’ she laughed.

Cor­rect breath­ing helps in deal­ing with body ache, anx­i­ety, de­pres­sion and stress.

‘‘The trou­ble is we don’t know these harm­ful habits creep into our lives. It hap­pens grad­u­ally but these changes can af­fect vir­tu­ally every as­pect of our health, in ways that are both sur­pris­ing and se­ri­ous,’’ Fer­ris said.

Every two hours a per­son should have a calm break, how­ever the ma­jor­ity re­places a calm minute of breath­ing with a cup of cof­fee or a cig­a­rette.

‘‘Take a cig­a­rette away and you will ex­hale and have calm breath­ing.’’

Fer­ris launched her on­line course, The Big Ex­hale, with 31 videos, which she has worked on for two years.

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