Slip joint en­gi­neer­ing helps pre­pare struc­tures for ris­ing traf­fic and cli­matic changes

DEMM Engineering & Manufacturing - - CASE STUDY - www.demm.co.nz/reader- en­quiry #160910

Aus­tralian de­signed and man­u­fac­tured com­pos­ite slip joints and slid­ing struc­tural bear­ings are in­creas­ingly be­ing used to pro­long the ser­vice life of ma­jor pub­lic and pri­vate struc­tures, cost- ef­fi­ciently en­hanc­ing their over­all safety and func­tion­al­ity even un­der chang­ing cli­matic and traf­fic load con­di­tions.

One ma­jor pub­lic fa­cil­ity ap­pli­ca­tion of Her­cules En­gi­neer­ing’s com­pos­ite slipjoints was in the con­struc­tion of the new seven-level, 567-space No 2 car park build­ing con­structed as part of the $1 bil­lion-plus re­de­vel­op­ment of the Royal North Shore Hos­pi­tal by Thiess.

“Th­ese cost-ef­fi­cient Aus­tralia­nengi­neered prod­ucts have been coping with the ex­tremes of the Aus­tralian and Asia- Pa­cific cli­mate and traf­fic loads for more than 40 years, so out­stand­ing ther­mal and load per­for­mance is built in to help cope with cli­mate change and traf­fic load is­sues,” said Her­cules En­gi­neer­ing Man­ager David Booty.

Her­cules En­gi­neer­ing sup­plied con­trac­tor Wide­form Con­struc­tion Pty Ltd with 265 me­tres of its Her­cus­lip Com­pos­ite Slipjoints for the No 2 carpark project. “This re­li­able, eas­ily ap­plied slip joint ma­te­rial is ideal for post-ten­sioned and cast in-situ slabs and load-bear­ing brick­work. It is specif­i­cally de­signed to cen­tralise loads and ac­com­mo­date ini­tial shrink­age and sub­se­quent ther­mal move­ment,” says Booty.

Strips of the com­pos­ite struc­ture – sealed for long-life pro­tec­tion against dust and de­bris – are in­stalled to pro­vide the flex­i­bil­ity to en­sure: • Even weight dis­tri­bu­tion of the

con­crete slab. • The abil­ity to ab­sorb slight ro­ta­tion of slabs as struc­tures set­tle fol­low­ing con­struc­tion (typ­i­cally ab­sorb­ing up to 0.33 ra­di­ans, or about 1.9 de­grees, of ac­cepted tol­er­ances of such move­ment). The built-in mar­gins of ab­sorp­tion avoid slab dam­age and stresses cre­ated by move­ment and fric­tion. • Flex­i­bil­ity to ab­sorb heavy traf­fic shock and vi­bra­tion, which over time can cre­ate se­vere struc­tural dam­age and shorten build­ing life­spans. • Flex­i­bil­ity to ab­sorb heat and cool­ing ex­pan­sion and con­trac­tion with weather and cli­matic vari­a­tions, also avoid­ing the build-up of struc­tural stresses and dam­age. “The use of HSC slip joint tech­nol­ogy will in many ways con­trib­ute to pro­long­ing the ser­vice life of the struc­tural com­po­nents at Royal North Shore No 2 Park­ing Build­ing, in­creas­ing the over­all safety and re­li­a­bil­ity of the struc­ture in in­creas­ingly heavy traf­fic con­di­tions as de­mand grows,” says Booty.

Pedes­trian bridges from Royal North Shore’s new No 2 car park are also pro­tected by Her­cules En­gi­neer­ing’s Aus­tralian-made tech­nol­ogy, this time in the form of Type D Her­cu­lon Struc­tural Bear­ings (HLD/SG), de­signed to ac­cept a lat­eral load of 30 per­cent of the ver­ti­cal rated load. Loads can be up to 600 kN per bear­ing in stock sizes, with higher ca­pac­ity avail­able cus­tom-en­gi­neered for par­tic­u­lar ap­pli­ca­tions.

Booty says the HLD/SG struc­tural bear­ings at Royal North Shore ac­com­mo­date the ex­pan­sion and con­trac­tion of the RNSH Dou­glas Link Bridge and the RNSH Acute Bridge, con­nect­ing the new carpark with the Dou­glas and Acute Ser­vices Build­ing. Such move­ments can re­sult from am­bi­ent tem­per­a­ture fluc­tu­a­tions im­pact­ing struc­tural steel mem­bers of the bridges,” he says.

Build­ings in which Her­cules en­gi­neer­ing tech­nolo­gies have also demon­strated longevity and high ef­fi­ciency in­clude land­marks such as the Aus­tralian Na­tional Gallery, Cen­tre­point Tower, David Jones prop­er­ties, Hang Seng Bank Hong Kong, Martin Place Sta­tion, Na­tional Ath­let­ics Sta­dium, Syd­ney Opera House, North­point Of­fice Tower North Syd­ney, Par­lia­ment House, Can­berra, Park Lane Ho­tel (Syd­ney) Post Of­fice Tower, Black Moun­tain, Can­berra, Qan­tas House (Syd­ney) Tooheys ex­pan­sion (Syd­ney), West­mead Hos­pi­tal, Wo­den Plaza and World Square Project (Syd­ney). Her­cules En­gi­neer­ing tech­nolo­gies are also ex­ten­sively in­volved in new med­i­cal, retail, univer­sity and schools, of­fice and in­dus­trial build­ings in­clud­ing in the ce­ment, min­ing and en­ergy in­dus­tries and in­fra­struc­ture in­clud­ing bridges.

ROYAL NORTH SHORE HOS­PI­TAL’S NEW P2 BUILD­ING, CEN­TRE, WITH PEDES­TRIAN BRIDGES TO THE DOU­GLAS AND ACUTE BUILD­INGS HLD STRUC­TURAL BEAR­INGS IN BRIDGE STRUC­TURES BE­FORE GROUTING, ABOVE, AND AF­TER GROUTING AND IN­STAL­LA­TION OF THE SUP­PORTED STRUC­TURE, BELOW. THE DE­SIGN OF HER­CULES EN­GI­NEER­ING’S HSC SLIP JOINT IS SHOWN, TOP OF PAGE

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