MOD­I­FIED CON­TAINER KEEPS EXPLOSIVES AND FLARES SAFELY CON­TAINED

DEMM Engineering & Manufacturing - - HEALTH & SAFETY -

In a ship­ping con­tainer first for New Zealand, safety and sur­vival com­pany Survitec Group is us­ing a mod­i­fied con­tainer known as a Re­lo­cat­able Ex­plo­sive Mag­a­zine (REM) to safely store flares, rock­ets and live am­mu­ni­tion.

The be­spoke stor­age con­tainer was de­vel­oped by ship­ping con­tainer spe­cial­ists Royal Wolf and is strong and ro­bust enough to with­stand a blast if ex­plo­sive ma­te­ri­als mal­func­tion or are ig­nited.

Survitec, which is New Zealand’s long­est run­ning safety and sur­vival sup­plier to the marine and avi­a­tion in­dus­tries, pro­vides marine dis­tress sig­nals, life rafts and other sur­vival equip­ment to cus­tomers such as the New Zealand De­fence Force, com­mer­cial marine and civil avi­a­tion op­er­a­tors, and recre­ational boat­ies.

The 20-foot REM con­tainer has 5mm thick steel walls and a 10mm thick steel door with the inside com­pletely lined and in­su­lated with tim­ber.

Dave Chap­man, Survitec Na­tional Sales Man­ager, says the need for the con­tainer arose when Survitec moved ear­lier this year from its in­ner- city site, which had an in­built dan­ger­ous goods bunker, to its Mt Welling­ton ser­vic­ing and ware­house fa­cil­ity.

“The con­tainer is ideal be­cause it is a be­spoke de­sign made es­pe­cially for Survitec’s very unique stor­age needs. It’s also af­ford­able be­cause we’re able to rent it rather than hav­ing the cap­i­tal out­lay of build­ing a pur­pose- built stor­age fa­cil­ity,” he said.

Chap­man says the REM is a cost­ef­fec­tive and highly ef­fi­cient so­lu­tion for com­pa­nies like Survitec who han­dle dan­ger­ous goods.

“We con­stantly strive to not only com­ply with, but to set the stan­dards for, health and safety within our in­dus­try, and the REM con­tainer helps make this process and meet­ing the rel­e­vant Health and Safety re­quire­ments much easier.”

Paul Creighton, Royal Wolf’s Ex­ec­u­tive Gen­eral Man­ager New Zealand, says the REM is an ex­am­ple of the ver­sa­til­ity of con­tain­ers and how they can be mod­i­fied for a wide range of uses.

“New Zealand’s stricter Health and Safety laws put more em­pha­sis on how dan­ger­ous goods should be treated so we’re par­tic­u­larly proud of this con­tainer be­cause it’s the first of its kind in New Zealand and takes stor­age of these sorts of ma­te­ri­als to an­other level. Con­tain­ers are an in­cred­i­bly strong and solid struc­ture with a 10 kPa pro­tec­tion level – and made from heavy gauge, cor­ro­sion re­sis­tant Corten steel. But they’re also very adapt­able and there re­ally is no limit to what you can make out of them and the REM highlights this,” said Creighton.

Q&A HOW DID THE REM CON­TAINER IDEA COME ABOUT?

Con­tain­ers are ide­ally suited to car­ry­ing and stor­ing this sort of cargo and Royal Wolf’s de­vel­op­ment of the REM 20 came about to meet de­mand from cus­tomers re­quest­ing this type of prod­uct, firstly in Aus­tralia, and now with Survitec in New Zealand.

HOW WAS THE CON­TAINER STRENGTH­ENED?

The REM 20 is not a stan­dard con­tainer. Whereas the side pan­els on a gen­eral pur­pose corten steel con­tainer vary be­tween 1.6mm and 2mm, the REM 20’s Corten A has 5mm thick walls, a thicker roof sec­tion and a 10mm thick steel door. The REM 20 has also been fur­ther strength­ened with a 3mm thick steel plate floor and in­ter­nal tim­ber lin­ing.

MORE DE­TAIL ON HOW IT WORKS AS A REM – SUCH AS THE PRO­TEC­TION RA­TIO AGAINST EXPLOSIVES?

Pro­tec­tion against explosives and other prod­ucts such as flares and live am­mu­ni­tion is pro­vided through in­stal­la­tion of an an­ti­static lin­ing and earth­ing bosses, pro­vi­sion of ducted ex­plo­sion vents and an ex­plo­sion re­sis­tant door, re­stric­tion of ac­cess to the con­tainer us­ing keyed se­cu­rity door locks, and im­pen­e­tra­ble vents. Ad­di­tion­ally, it is in­stalled with min­eral wool in­su­la­tion in the walls to pro­tect from ex­treme heat and cold, the doors and vents are also pro­tected from weather, and dur­ing use there are lim­its to the vol­ume of ma­te­rial that can be stored in the con­tainer.

WHAT SORT OF WOOD IS USED AS IN­SU­LA­TION INSIDE THE CON­TAINER?

The con­tainer is lined with a mois­ture con­trolled marine grade 18mm thick ply that is coated with white paint.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand

© PressReader. All rights reserved.