Yealands Es­tate Wines, a toast for the sum­mer fes­tiv­i­ties

SUM­MER FES­TI­VALS AND A RECYCLABLE AND DURABLE PLAS­TIC WINE BOT­TLE - A PER­FECT MATCH.

Element - - LIFE STYLE - By Jamie Joseph yealandsestate.co.nz | sound­son.net

Marl­bor­ough-based Yealands Es­tate Wines is syn­ony­mous with sus­tain­abil­ity and in­no­va­tion, and they know how to have a good time. One of the great out­door events lined up this sum­mer is a mu­sic fes­ti­val called Sound’s On pro­duced by LOOP, the green fin­gers pro­mot­ers that brought us Sum­mer Sun­day in Matakana this year. The fes­ti­val pro­mot­ers seized the op­por­tu­nity to work with Yealands, the pri­vately owned win­ery that re­ceived car­boNZeroCertTM cer­ti­fi­ca­tion in April 2009. The Sound’s On out­door mu­sic fes­ti­val is sched­uled for 23 March and will be serv­ing Peter Yealands wine with an eco- twist. The award win­ning wine is pack­aged in light­weight plas­tic bot­tles that pro­duce 54% less green­house emis­sions than a 750ml glass bot­tle. The Peter Yealands Sau­vi­gnon Blanc 2012 PET (Plas­tic) bot­tle is a tro­phy and five times gold medal win­ner, col­lect­ing the stamp of ap­proval from around the world, and lo­cally fly­ing off the shop shelves with cu­ri­ous haste. Knock­ing on sum­mer’s door, it is an ideal sea­sonal com­ple­ment. The plas­tic bot­tle is made from Poly­thy­lene Tereph­tha­late (PET), which means it does not con­tain BPA, the same plas­tic used to package water, soft drinks, salad dressings and the ma­jor­ity of all plas­tics found in food shops. And it’s shat­ter­proof and very light, mak­ing it ideal for out­door oc­ca­sions. Says LOOP pro­moter Mi­kee Tucker, “Last year’s fes­ti­val Sum­mer Sun­day is con­tin­u­ing now un­der the new name of Sound’s On. It’s a coming to­gether and cel­e­bra­tion of Kiwi mu­sic and sus­tain­able ini­tia­tives. Hav­ing Yealands on board fits per­fectly with us as they re­alise that sus­tain­abil­ity and busi­ness aren’t mu­tu­ally ex­clu­sive ideas and that great things can come from hav­ing such an ethos.” Fes­ti­vals bring peo­ple to­gether in the spirit of cul­ture and com­mu­nity, and for Yealands staff back at the vine­yard in Marl­bor­ough, life really is a pic­nic. With the re­cent ad­di­tion of a com­mu­nity garden ev­ery­one has se­lected a crop to grow, with the plan to split the pro­ceeds amongst the staff and the Blen­heim food bank. In re­cent weeks Yealands staff planted over 30,000 na­tive trees and flaxes on the prop­erty, and the lat­est buzz is that bee­hives are to be added next. Af­ter a strong lamb­ing sea­son, Yealands now have just over 1,100 Baby­doll sheep on the vine­yard. It is still a cou­ple of years away from get­ting rid of the lawn mow­ers, but the sheep are work­ing well and Yealands plan to of­fer Baby­doll scarves through their cel­lar door later in the year. Yealands has a rep­u­ta­tion for do­ing things dif­fer­ently. In Oc­to­ber they launched the world’s first Sau­vi­g­noir, a blend that is 95% Marl­bor­ough Sau­vi­gnon Blanc and about 5% Tein­turier, a spe­cial red grape va­ri­ety from Chile with a very dark red flesh. Says Peter Yealands, “A lot of R&D has gone into the Sau­vi­g­noir over the pe­riod of one year. We have al­ways seen our­selves as an in­no­va­tive com­pany and we be­lieve that this is go­ing to work. The nose is just fan­tas­tic. The berries really jump out at you.” Just in time for sum­mer. Serve chilled.

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