How to be kind

Element - - Bee Awareness Month -

PRO­VIDE WA­TER

Yes, bees need wa­ter – last sum­mer’s drought af­fected hives and honey yields sig­nif­i­cantly. Res­ur­rect your old bird (and bee) bath. Bees use wa­ter to cool hives down and wa­ter down their honey for their bee ba­bies. Avoid honey wa­ter, but sugar syrup is OK.

GET GAR­DEN­ING

Fill your back­yard and neigh­bour­hood with bee-friendly plants. Make sure there is some­thing flow­er­ing in all sea­sons so the hon­ey­bees don’t go hun­gry. Check out treesfor­beesnz.org/gar­den for ideas.

EAT LO­CALLY MADE HONEY

Im­ported honey can be the source of bee dis­eases not yet in New Zealand.

DON’T DE­STROY SWARMS

Swarm­ing bees is a nat­u­ral oc­cur­rence, and bees are least likely to sting when swarm­ing. Call the NBA and a grate­ful bee­keeper will likely grate­fully col­lect bees to es­tab­lish a new hive.

STAY AWAY FROM SPRAYS

Many con­tain chem­i­cals like neon­i­coti­noids that can im­pact on bee health. If you must use them, use beefriendly sprays and read the in­struc­tions care­fully. Spray in the evenings once the bees have gone to bed.

Or try this or­gan­icn al­llpur­pose in­sect spray thanks to Eco­s­torek

1. Chop, grind, or liq­uefy a gar­lic bulb and a small onion.

2. Add 1 tsp of cayenne pep­per and mix all in­gre­di­ents with 1 litre of wa­ter.

3. Let the liq­uid steep for about an hour be­fore strain­ing through a clean piece of cheese­cloth or fine muslin.

4. Add 1 tbsp of Eco­s­tore dish­wash­ing liq­uid to the

strained liq­uid and mix well.

5. Pour into a clean, la­belled spray bot­tle.

6. Spray your plants thor­oughly, in­clud­ing leaf un­der­sides.

7. Mix­ture can be stored for up to a week in the fridge.

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