IN SEA­SON: LEMONS Bring some zing to the ta­ble

WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LEMONS, IT’S TIME TO GET COOK­ING

Food - - Content - RECIPES & STYLING SO­PHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE PROPS SACHA ANDERSON

LLe­mons

emons add won­der­ful cit­rus zing to both sweet and savoury dishes and are an in­valu­able in­gre­di­ent for every cook.

Glob­ally there are dozens of va­ri­eties, while in New Zealand there are just a few widely avail­able, each one hav­ing dif­fer­ent char­ac­ter­is­tics. Eureka lemons, for ex­am­ple, are acidic, so are great for mar­malades and tangy sauces. Yen bens have a flavour­some skin, so are a good op­tion for zest­ing. Mey­ers are quite sweet, largely be­cause they are a hy­brid of lemon and man­darin, so are com­monly used in desserts and some­times ap­pear raw in sal­ads and sweets. The recipes over the fol­low­ing pages will work with any va­ri­ety.

Like all cit­rus fruits, lemons are a great source of vi­ta­min C, which is why his­tor­i­cally they were used by sailors to pre­vent scurvy. An ef­fec­tive detox­i­fier, lemon juice squeezed into warm water will also aid di­ges­tion, bal­ance the body’s ph lev­els and re­duce in­flam­ma­tion. They can even help the body cope if de­hy­drated or oxy­gen de­prived – Sir Ed­mund Hil­lary swore by lemon juice and water when climb­ing Ever­est.

Not only are they great in cook­ing, the anti-bac­te­rial prop­er­ties of lemons make them ef­fec­tive in ev­ery­thing from beauty treat­ments to house­work.

To get more juice out of your lemon, lightly push down on it and roll in a cir­cu­lar mo­tion on your kitchen bench be­fore cut­ting. Store lemons at room tem­per­a­ture, and once cut, keep re­frig­er­ated in an air­tight con­tainer.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand

© PressReader. All rights reserved.