SKIN CANCER

Good Health Choices - - Be Informed -

Skin cancer oc­curs when skin cells are dam­aged, for ex­am­ple, by over­ex­po­sure to UV ra­di­a­tion from the sun.

PRO­TECT­ING YOUR SKIN

The sooner a skin cancer is iden­ti­fied and treated, the bet­ter your chance of avoid­ing surgery or, in the case of a se­ri­ous me­lanoma or other skin cancer, po­ten­tial dis­fig­ure­ment or even death. Be­come fa­mil­iar with the look of your skin, so you pick up any changes that might sug­gest a skin cancer. Look for:

Crusty, non-heal­ing sores Small lumps that are red, pale or pearly in colour New spots, freck­les or any moles chang­ing in colour, thick­ness or shape over a pe­riod of weeks to months (es­pe­cially those dark brown to black, red or blue-black in colour)

ON THE BRIGHT SIDE

The Sun Protection Alert is re­ported daily by NIWA to alert you to those times when the UV level is 3 or above and sun protection is needed (sun­smart.org.nz). You can also down­load the free app, uv2Day, to check the cur­rent UV In­dex level.

SUN­BURN ALERT

It is no se­cret that a high in­take of al­co­hol can be detri­men­tal to health. A new study pro­vides fur­ther ev­i­dence of this, af­ter link­ing high al­co­hol con­sump­tion with an in­creased risk of skin cancer. Re­searchers found that ev­ery 10g in­crease in daily al­co­hol con­sump­tion was as­so­ci­ated with a greater risk of basal cell car­ci­noma and squa­mous cell car­ci­noma, which are the two main types of non-me­lanoma skin can­cers.

KEEP AN EYE ON IT

Have reg­u­lar skin checks with your GP, and book a yearly MoleMap to keep track of any changes in your skin. Visit molemap.co.nz to make a book­ing.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand

© PressReader. All rights reserved.