The ben­e­fits of hav­ing more laugh­ter in your life

LAUGH­TER IS A GREAT MOOD BOOSTER AND, JOK­ING APART, IT’S GOOD FOR YOUR BODY TOO

Good Health Choices - - Content -

We all know laugh­ter is the best-kept se­cret for cur­ing life’s ail­ments – with the added bonus of work­ing your abs – which is why there should al­ways be room for more com­edy in your life.

A day with­out laugh­ter is a day wasted, and if you can laugh at your­self, even bet­ter. One study sug­gests adults laugh an av­er­age of 17.5 times a day. The sim­ple act of laugh­ing 10 to 15 min­utes daily can burn up to 40 calo­ries. Laugh­ing can im­prove im­mu­nity, help with in­som­nia, de­crease cor­ti­sol hor­mones and reg­u­late blood su­gar lev­els.

Sci­en­tists be­lieve hu­mans laughed be­fore they had the lung strength for lan­guage, ba­bies as young as 17 days old have been ob­served do­ing it and, be­lieve it or not, even rats laugh – they’re known to have very tick­lish necks.

Your sense of hu­mour may even be ge­netic. In a North­west­ern Univer­sity study of more than 300 peo­ple, those with the short ver­sion, or al­lele, of gene 5-HTTLPR were quicker to laugh at car­toons or funny movie clips than those with the long ver­sion of the gene, which has long been as­so­ci­ated with de­pres­sion.

Ac­cord­ing to a Univer­sity of Mary­land study, only about 10 per cent of laugh­ter is gen­er­ated by a joke. So, we’ve put to­gether a list of other ideas guar­an­teed to make you gig­gle.

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