The chem­i­cals in food that may be mak­ing you hun­grier

TRY­ING TO LOSE WEIGHT BUT FIND­ING YOUR­SELF STUCK? IT MAY BE DOWN TO WHAT’S IN THE FOOD YOU EAT, SPECIF­I­CALLY THE CHEM­I­CALS THAT COULD BE MAK­ING YOU HUN­GRIER. WE TAKE A CLOSER LOOK

Good Health Choices - - Be Content -

When it comes to our body’s care­fully tuned sys­tems and com­plex pro­cesses, you don’t have to be a sci­en­tist to know that chem­i­cals and pol­lu­tants can have a big im­pact on our health. Headaches and al­ler­gies are com­mon signs that some­thing’s amiss, but what if there were ev­ery­day chem­i­cals that were af­fect­ing your waist­line, too?

It’s all linked to our brain pro­cess­ing, and the way cer­tain ad­di­tives are now thought to trig­ger the brain to make us hun­gry.

Ex­perts say that while our brain has evolved to pro­mote eat­ing, to en­sure we sur­vive and that the brain gets enough en­ergy to func­tion, sci­en­tists are now see­ing a newer phenomenon. It’s dubbed ‘hun­gry brain syn­drome’, and it means a cy­cle where the more we eat, the greed­ier our brain be­comes.

Ger­man brain re­searcher

Achim Peters says chem­i­cal sig­nals in food have long been un­der­es­ti­mated, and that there is now ev­i­dence that flavour en­hancers, soft­en­ers and even pes­ti­cides can in­flu­ence our body weight. Put sim­ply, these sub­stances af­fect our grey mat­ter, and trig­ger false sig­nals which en­cour­age the brain to de­mand more kilo­joules, pro­gram­ming the body to put on weight.

Ac­cord­ing to Peters, it’s yet an­other rea­son we should be bas­ing our di­ets on nat­u­ral whole­foods.

“Peo­ple who con­sume more nat­u­ral foods − in other words, who eat fewer chem­i­cal mes­sen­gers − ex­pose their brain to fewer false sig­nals,” he ex­plains. “This en­ables the brain to bet­ter reg­u­late en­ergy bal­ance, con­se­quently re­sult­ing in a self­heal­ing of sorts. Our brain can dic­tate whether we get fat­ter or stay slim.”

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