TROUBLESHOOT YOUR ZZZZZS

Good Health Choices - - Be Informed -

Tar­get­ing sleep prob­lems re­quires a broad ap­proach be­cause peo­ple struggle for a va­ri­ety of rea­sons. Here are some com­monly asked ques­tions that could help pin­point your spe­cific is­sues.

Q. WHAT IF I CAN’T SHUT OFF MY MIND?

A. Some peo­ple can’t switch off their thoughts. If this is a prob­lem for you, set aside a ‘worry time’ in the evening to think about what has been hap­pen­ing dur­ing the day. This will help put your mind at rest so you’re less likely to stew over prob­lems when you go to bed. Keep the hour be­fore bed as your wind-down time.

Q. WHAT IF I STILL CAN’T GET TO SLEEP, DE­SPITE MY BEST EF­FORTS?

A. Sleep is not some­thing you can force. If you’re not asleep within 20 to 30 min­utes of go­ing to bed, get up. Sit qui­etly in a dark­ened room. Don’t watch tele­vi­sion, use a com­puter, eat, drink or do house­work. When you feel sleepy again, go back to bed. This helps your mind link bed with sleep, and not with be­ing ag­i­tated or toss­ing and turn­ing.

Q. WILL EX­ER­CISE HELP ME SLEEP?

A. As a rule, ex­er­cise is good for sleep, but not just be­fore bed. The best times to work out are in the morn­ing and be­fore din­ner.

Q. IS THERE ANY­THING I CAN DO DUR­ING THE DAY TO HELP?

A. Some peo­ple use their bed­room as a liv­ing room, and study, watch tele­vi­sion, make phone calls and read books in it. This will make it harder to sleep be­cause your brain will no longer link your bed with sleep. Use your bed­room for sleep and sex only.

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