Strug­gling with breast­feed­ing?

Good Health Choices - - Be Informed -

There’s a myth that breast­feed­ing comes nat­u­rally, but for some women it isn’t easy and it may take weeks to get the hang of it. For oth­ers, it may not be pos­si­ble at all. Breast­feed­ing is rec­om­mended for the ben­e­fits it of­fers mother and baby so it can be a good idea to stick it out for one month, with the help of a lac­ta­tion con­sul­tant, to see how you go. But the most im­por­tant thing is that the baby is well fed and that you’re cop­ing well, so if try­ing to breast­feed is caus­ing you dis­tress, then it won’t do ei­ther of you any good to per­sist.

DOWN UN­DER

Grow­ing a hu­man be­ing and de­liv­er­ing it safely into the world is no mean feat and there’s a lot go­ing on down there.

YOUR PELVIC FLOOR

Have you no­ticed that since hav­ing your baby, you leak a lit­tle urine when you laugh or sneeze? One in three women will ex­pe­ri­ence light blad­der leak­age and giv­ing birth is the num­ber-one cause.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

All the ex­tra pres­sure on your pelvic floor dur­ing preg­nancy is usu­ally to blame – as well as the hor­mones that kick in to soften all your mus­cles in prepa­ra­tion for the birth.

HOW LONG WILL IT LAST?

It should im­prove within a year, but a visit to a pelvic floor phys­io­ther­a­pist can give you a bet­ter idea of what’s go­ing on and they can give you plenty of tips to help you get back into shape down there.

WHAT TO DO

Most symp­toms of pelvic floor dys­func­tion (from in­con­ti­nence to pro­lapse) can be treated or pre­vented. Ig­nor­ing the signs will sim­ply in­crease your chances of a longterm prob­lem.

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