‘He was just a boy’

Kapi-Mana News - - FRONT PAGE -

re­ply from in­side num­ber 13A. ‘‘But you’re not giv­ing me the cig­a­rettes.’’

‘‘I’ve got the cig­a­rettes in my hand, Pita.’’ ‘‘Well, give it then.’’ ‘‘Look,’’ the ne­go­tia­tor replied. ‘‘I’ve got a fam­ily to go home to. I don’t want to come close to you while you’ve got a gun.’’

Te Kira would not budge: ‘‘Throw it in the win­dow.’’

‘‘You throw the gun out of the win­dow and then I will throw you the cig­a­rettes.’’

In the end it was Te Kira who wrote. He scrawled all over the walls, telling his fam­ily how much he loved them, and: ‘‘F... the po­lice.’’

SANCTUARY IN A STORM

Out­side, an en­tire neigh­bour­hood was in evac­u­a­tion mode.

Pa­nia Houka­mau-Nga­heu can’t quite be­lieve it’s been a year since the week­end she fed 500 peo­ple.

‘‘It was good train­ing. We’ve shel­tered peo­ple through two floods since then.

‘‘I had no idea it was go­ing to turn out as big as it did. Prob­a­bly a good thing.’’

It was big – over the two days, her marae, Te Horouta, fed Wai­tan­girua peo­ple, armed of­fend­ers squad mem­bers and Te Kira’s fam­ily on food do­nated by Porirua City Coun­cil and res­i­dents.

PHOTO: ROSS GIBLIN/FAIRFAX NZ

A year af­ter the Porirua siege, Damien Poutu plays out­side the house where gun­man Pita Te Kira holed up for two days be­fore be­ing found dead.

PHOTO: ROSS GIBLIN/FAIRFAX NZ

Kokiri Cres res­i­dent Pa­tri­cia Pukeke says for three months af­ter the siege, her grand­chil­dren Aries, 10, and Damien Poutu, 11, and Jesse Brown, 8, were too scared to play out­side.

PHOTO: NZ PO­LICE

Pita Te Kira was 29 when he was in­volved in an armed stand­off with po­lice for 26 hours.

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