In­su­la­tion keeps the damp away

Matamata Chronicle - - News -

If there’s still damp­ness un­der your house, an on-ground vapour bar­rier can stop the mois­ture ris­ing up from the ground in­side.

As the nights get cooler, New Zealan­ders will again be reach­ing for their heaters – but the En­ergy Ef­fi­ciency and Con­ser­va­tion Author­ity says get­ting the en­vi­ron­ment right is just as im­por­tant as the type of heater you use.

In­su­lat­ing a home’s ceil­ing and un­der­floor will make the sin­gle big­gest dif­fer­ence to keep­ing the heat in.

So, ac­cord­ing to EECA, if your house is cold, sort the in­su­la­tion be­fore buy­ing a new heater.

Elim­i­nat­ing damp­ness is also im­por­tant for your health and com­fort. Damp­ness leads to mould which can harm your health. Elim­i­nat­ing mois­ture at the source, com­bined with good heat­ing and ven­ti­la­tion, are the most ef­fec­tive ways to keep your house dry, warm and healthy.

First, fix any drainage or plumb­ing is­sues that are caus­ing wa­ter to col­lect un­der or near your house, EECA ad­vises.

If there’s still damp­ness un­der your house, an on-ground vapour bar­rier can stop the mois­ture ris­ing up from the ground in­side and make sure all the vents to un­der the house are clear of things like plants and porch fur­ni­ture so your home can nat­u­rally ven­ti­late.

Here are some ev­ery­day tips for keep­ing your home warm and dry:

Open win­dows reg­u­larly to re­move damp, stale air.

Keep­ing bed­room win­dows (with se­cu­rity stays) open slightly at night helps re­duce con­den­sa­tion on win­dows in the morn­ing.

Us­ing ex­trac­tor fans in the kitchen when cooking, in the bath­room when show­er­ing, and en­sur­ing your clothes dryer is vented to the out­side all help pre­vent the buildup of damp­ness in a win­ter home. If you don’t have, or can’t in­stall ex­trac­tor fans, open a win­dow when show­er­ing, cooking or dry­ing clothes to let the moist air out.

In­door dry­ing racks are a com­mon sight in win­ter, but lead to mois­ture lin­ger­ing in­side.

Once your home is dry, it’s im­por­tant to elim­i­nate draughts or the heat will just go out the win­dow - or un­der the door.

Pulling cur­tains, closing doors, us­ing a draught stop­per un­der doors, and en­sur­ing win­dows are well sealed will all help keep the heat in the room you are in.

If your house is cold, sort the in­su­la­tion be­fore buy­ing a new heater.

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