Armistice Day com­mem­o­rated

Matamata Chronicle - - Your Paper, Your Place - ABBY BROWN

Mata­mata re­mem­bered the sac­ri­fice made dur­ing World War I through a com­mem­o­ra­tive Armistice Day ser­vice on Novem­ber 11.

The com­bined ser­vice was held at the Mata­mata Me­mo­rial Cen­tre with about 60 peo­ple at­tend­ing, in­clud­ing mem­bers of the Mata­mata, Mor­rinsville and Te Aroha RSAs and a pla­toon of Air Train­ing Corps cadets from Mor­rinsville. Mata­mata RSA pres­i­dent Graeme Water­son said the event was ‘‘not to glo­rify war but to ac­knowl­edge those of our dis­trict who served and those who died in the Great War of 1914 – 1918’’. He de­tailed New Zealand’s in­volve­ment in WWI, in­clud­ing tak­ing Samoa back from the Ger­mans. Mayor Jan Barnes spoke of how on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 the ces­sa­tion of hos­til­i­ties on the Western Front of WWI was de­clared.

Armistice Day marks the armistice signed be­tween the Al­lies of World War I and Ger­many at Com­piegne, France.

New Zealand, with a pop­u­la­tion of 1.1 mil­lion in 1914, sent 100,000 men and women, or 10 per cent of its 1914 pop­u­la­tion be­tween the ages of 20-45, abroad to World War One. 16,700 died and over 40,000 were wounded – a higher per capita ca­su­alty rate than any other coun­try in­volved.

Armistice Day marks the armistice signed be­tween the Al­lies of World War I and Ger­many at Com­piegne, France.

PHOTO: ABBY BROWN

Bos­ton Ham­mond, 11 months, hold­ing his late great-grand­fa­ther Rus­sell Ham­mond’s medals, and his gran­dad Des Ham­mond.

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