FEEL­ING DRAINED?

Nadia - - WELL-THY ENERGY -

NA­DIA NATUROPATH AND MED­I­CAL HERBALIST AN­NALIESE JONES SHARES SOME OF THE REA­SONS YOU MIGHT BE LACK­ING IN EN­ERGY, AND SUG­GESTS SOME EASY WAYS TO GET YOUR BOUNCE BACK

Roughly 50 per­cent of my clients lack en­ergy. Th­ese peo­ple are strug­gling to get out of bed, to ex­er­cise, to run around with their kids, even to have sex. They make plans that never even­tu­ate be­cause they can’t muster the en­ergy. Their re­la­tion­ships, jobs and dreams all suf­fer.

There are many driv­ers of low en­ergy in­clud­ing cer­tain dis­eases which are im­por­tant to rule out. If it’s pos­si­ble you’ve be­come de­pressed, see your GP, a coun­sel­lor or psychologist. If there’s di­a­betes in your fam­ily, check that your blood sug­ars and Hba1c haven’t crept up. If you have a coeliac in your fam­ily or some­one who’s had thy­roid prob­lems, those ill­nesses are worth rul­ing out, too.

Some med­i­ca­tions can also cause lethargy, most no­tably statins (for re­duc­ing choles­terol), beta block­ers and an­ti­his­tamines. You can al­ways chat to your doc­tor about your dose but never stop taking your med­i­ca­tions with­out dis­cussing it with him or her first.

Other non-dis­ease-re­lated driv­ers of low en­ergy can be nu­tri­ent in­ad­e­qua­cies. You may have nu­tri­ent lev­els just within the so-called nor­mal range, but they’re still low enough to make you feel below par. The two most com­mon in­ad­e­qua­cies I see are: B12 This lit­tle B vi­ta­min packs a big en­ergy punch. For some­thing so vi­tal to mi­to­chon­drial per­for­mance (mi­to­chon­dria are the power plants of every hu­man cell) it’s sur­pris­ing how hard it is to get it from our diet. Beef and lamb (es­pe­cially liver) is by far the eas­i­est source of B12 but you’ll find some in sar­dines, salmon, egg yolks, mack­erel and cot­tage cheese. We tend to think we’re cov­ered by taking a mul­tivi­ta­min or B com­plex but B12 is tricky to ab­sorb from the di­ges­tive sys­tem. That’s why if you have dan­ger­ously low lev­els, you’ll re­ceive an in­jec­tion straight into the blood­stream (by­pass­ing the gut to avoid any ab­sorp­tion is­sues). If you do

take a B12 sup­ple­ment, make sure it’s the methyl­cobal­amin form and is a sub­lin­gual tablet (one you suck un­der the tongue). That way all the veins and cap­il­lar­ies un­der your tongue will ab­sorb it straight into the blood­stream.

Iron­test

When you have a blood

for iron, it’s im­por­tant to be aware of the nor­mal range. The range for fer­ritin, which rep­re­sents iron stor­age, is 20-160 (for women, depend­ing on age). I work on im­prov­ing iron lev­els when fer­ritin goes below 40, es­pe­cially if it’s been trend­ing down over time. Red meat is the most con­cen­trated source of iron but you’ll also find good amounts in eggs and tofu. Some­times the best way to im­prove iron can be to stop los­ing it. There are some foods and drinks that rob our food of iron. Those con­tain­ing tan­nins, such as tea, red wine and cof­fee, are the worst cul­prits. Be­cause of this, th­ese drinks are best con­sumed two hours be­fore or af­ter an iron-rich meal (sorry steak-and-red-wine lovers). Zinc or cal­cium sup­ple­ments also in­ter­fere with iron ab­sorp­tion, so fol­low the same ad­vice. On the flip-side, vi­ta­min C-rich food or drink en­hances iron ab­sorp­tion, so add some cap­sicum or cit­rus to your side salad when en­joy­ing an iron-rich meal.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand

© PressReader. All rights reserved.