PRO­DUC­TION TIME­LINE

New Zealand Classic Car - - Feature Car -

1968

HK: Holden’s all-new pil­lar­less coupé, the first lo­cal Aus­tralian­built ve­hi­cle of its type, was avail­able in three ver­sions — the race-bred GTS 327 fit­ted with a Us-built 5.3-litre V8; the GTS (with 186S six-cylin­der or 5.0-litre V8); and the stan­dard model, which came with ei­ther a 2.6- or 3.0-litre six-cylin­der mo­tor. Bruce Mcphee and Barry Mul­hol­land drove their GTS 327 to win the HardieFerodo 500 — Holden’s first vic­tory at the an­nual Bathurst race.

1969

HT: Fol­low­ing a facelift, the only sig­nif­i­cant change was the adop­tion of a larger, 5.74-litre Chevro­let en­gine for the topof-the-line GTS — now badged ac­cord­ingly as the ‘GTS 350’. Colin Bond and Tony Roberts con­tin­ued the Monaro’s win­ning ways at Bathurst, scor­ing a pop­u­lar vic­tory in their GTS 350.

1970

HG: The fi­nal re­fine­ment of the HK/ HT mod­els, and the last year for the Monaro’s orig­i­nal de­sign. Apart from mi­nor cos­metic changes, the only me­chan­i­cal changes were up­graded brakes and, for the GTS, softer sus­pen­sion set­tings — per­haps a re­flec­tion of the fact that the To­rana had now taken over as Holden’s race weapon of choice, al­though Norm Beechey would be­come 1970s Aus­tralian Tour­ing Car Cham­pion in his Monaro.

1971

HQ: Ma­jor changes came with the HQ mod­els and brought in a slight down­grade of the Monaro GTS range, with the GTS 350 no longer vary­ing spe­cific model badg­ing. As well, the coupé was now joined by a four-door ver­sion.

1974

HJ: Fol­low­ing an­other facelift, per­for­mance op­tions such as the man­ual gear­box and 350 V8 had now been dis­con­tin­ued along with the base Monaro coupé. The Monaro GTS was avail­able with ei­ther a 4.1-litre or 5.0-litre V8. The HJ coupé was dis­con­tin­ued in 1975.

1976

HX: Fol­low­ing a mi­nor facelift, Holden de­cided to quit re­main­ing stock of the now dis­con­tin­ued coupé bod­ies by in­tro­duc­ing the Monaro LE (Lim­ited Edi­tion). These cars were fit­ted with dis­tinc­tive ‘hon­ey­comb’ al­loy wheels, and 580 ex­am­ples were built.

1977

HZ: With the fi­nal end of the Monaro as a two-door coupé, the car was now strictly a four­door model, the last gasp be­ing the fit­ment of RTS sus­pen­sion. Pro­duc­tion of the GTS ended in De­cem­ber 1978.

2001–2005

Orig­i­nally shown as a con­cept car in 1998, the next-gen­er­a­tion Monaro was es­sen­tially a twodoor ver­sion of the then-cur­rent VT Com­modore. Pow­ered by ei­ther a su­per­charged V6 (CV6) or 5.7-litre V8 (CV8), the Monaro was avail­able with a six-speed man­ual or four-speed auto trans­mis­sion. The model went through an S2 model (2003) and S3 (2004), by which time the CV6 had been dropped due to poor sales. A run of 1100 CV8-Z cars saw Holden drop the Monaro name­plate yet again — with the two-door Com­modore con­cept car­ried on as the HSV Coupe GTO and GTS.

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