Up­hol­stery

GENE R A L LY, THI S I S THE F I NA L P I EC E O F T H E P U Z Z L E T H AT P U T S THE F I NI SHING TOUCH O N ANY R E S TOR AT I O N P ROJ EC T. WIT H T H I S I N MIND, W E TA L K T O A F E W E X P E R T S TO F I ND O U T WHAT GOE S I NTO TOP - T I E R U

New Zealand Classic Car - - Contents -

If you’re in the lower North Island and your clas­sic or cus­tom ve­hi­cle is in need of a re­trim, get in touch with Chris Po­cock of Clas­sic and Cus­tom Mo­tor Trim­mers. A pas­sion­ate in­di­vid­ual who spe­cial­izes in such things, Chris has op­er­ated his own business for eight years and ac­cu­mu­lated a wealth of knowl­edge within the in­dus­try that spans 30 years. He has pro­duced some stun­ning ve­hi­cles in his time, in­clud­ing the ’55 Chevro­let we fea­tured in Au­gust 2014.

Chris loves giv­ing back to the com­mu­nity and at­tends plenty of car shows with re­cently com­pleted clas­sics and cus­toms to dis­play a range of his prod­ucts and ser­vices. And he doesn’t only work on cars — you’ll find him labour­ing over all sorts of marine ap­pli­ca­tions, as well as mo­tor­bikes.

Chris as­sures us that some trips to the up­hol­stery shop re­sult from bad main­te­nance, and of­fers some tips. He says that, with leather, you must never for­get that, “The cow has stopped eat­ing grass, so you’re the one that needs to feed it now. Be care­ful with what type of cloth­ing you wear, as ink-soak is ex­tremely com­mon. If you’re wear­ing fairly new jeans, throw a towel down, and en­sure [that] you don’t have items in your pock­ets. Also, re­move bulky items from your pock­ets that may cause un­nec­es­sary wear.” Chris even men­tions that plenty of clients, when given the op­tion, opt for vinyl, as the dif­fer­ence can’t be seen by the un­trained eye, and it is more re­silient to wear and tear.

Dion Hunter from Cover Me says that, af­ter 22 years in the in­dus­try, he’s most cer­tainly seen some things. Af­ter 17 years of up­hol­stery work, he set up his own business, ini­tially work­ing from his home garage. One year later, it was burst­ing at the seams and a much larger work­shop was re­quired, as clients soon caught on to his ex­cep­tional qual­ity.

Fast for­ward to 2016, and Dion hasn’t looked back — his main mis­sion be­ing to ex­ceed clients’ ex­pec­ta­tions. Dion is a lover of clas­sic cars and en­joys bring­ing them up to orig­i­nal or fac­tory-like stan­dard, or fitting com­plete cus­tom one-off in­te­ri­ors — which­ever the client prefers. He loves work­ing with clients to pro­duce their ul­ti­mate in­te­rior, as he’s got plenty of unique ideas and ways to im­prove the fin­ish and feel of your in­te­rior with­out dis­rupt­ing the per­fect OEM ap­pear­ance.

To make your life eas­ier when you get your car’s up­hol­stery done, Dion of­fers the fol­low­ing ad­vice, which will no doubt save you count­less headaches. First, while clas­sic car en­thu­si­asts should feel com­fort­able strip­ping in­te­ri­ors them­selves, they should be wary that in­ex­pe­ri­ence in do­ing so may lead to fur­ther costs. Dion says clients of­ten want to strip an in­te­rior down them­selves, “to save on cost. How­ever, this is some­times not the case, as vi­tal com­po­nents can go miss­ing or are binned [due to dam­age]. Even if the parts are old, keep them, as we can re­fur­bish and repli­cate them if re­quired, but, if they’re not on hand, it’s much harder.”

Dion is al­ways happy to dis­cuss projects with prospec­tive cus­tomers, of­fer­ing ad­vice and so­lu­tions to cater to ev­ery type of ve­hi­cle, so if you’re in the re­gion, be sure to visit or give Dion a call. Some of the items an au­to­mo­tive up­hol­sterer or trim­mer may be able to re­pair, re­place, or cus­tom­ize are: • In­te­rior carpets — In most of our clas­sic cars, you’ll find car­pet on the floor and, in many cases, the boot as well. Au­to­mo­tive car­pet is de­signed to be ex­tremely durable and stain re­sis­tant, but the ma­te­rial can wear out or be­come dam­aged with reg­u­lar wear and tear. • Seats — As we sug­gested ear­lier, most clas­sic car own­ers as­so­ciate au­to­mo­bile up­hol­stery with car seats. De­pend­ing on the ma­te­ri­als used — fab­ric, vinyl, or leather — the cost to re­place will dif­fer. • Head­lin­ers — The head­liner is usu­ally a fab­ric or vinyl ma­te­rial that cov­ers the in­side of the roof. It’s not un­com­mon to find them

29, Tau­riko, Tau­ranga 751 State High­way ry.co.nz tgaqual­i­tyuphol­ste

For many of us, the thought of re­uphol­ster­ing our clas­sic is a daunt­ing prospect in­deed, and, if you’ve never re­quired the ser­vices of an up­hol­sterer be­fore, you may be un­sure about how to pro­ceed.

To en­sure you find the right pro­fes­sional for the job, it’s im­por­tant to fo­cus specif­i­cally on shops or pro­fes­sional up­hol­ster­ers that spe­cial­ize in au­to­mo­tive-up­hol­stery ap­pli­ca­tions, as men­tioned ear­lier.

Don’t be afraid to ask about their ex­pe­ri­ence with your type of project. Even within the au­to­mo­bile­uphol­stery field, ex­pe­ri­ence dif­fers, as some may spe­cial­ize in one par­tic­u­lar type of up­hol­stery — a business that pri­mar­ily re­pairs con­vert­ible tops may not have the ex­pe­ri­ence to ef­fec­tively re­place seat trim, for in­stance, or an au­to­mo­tive up­hol­sterer that works on mainly late-model cars may not have suf­fi­cient skills to tackle a vin­tage or clas­sic car up­hol­stery re­pair. The main thing is to ask lots of ques­tions and lis­ten to the ex­perts.

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