WORTH 1000 WORDS

There’s a phrase that we’ve all heard be­fore — ‘a pic­ture paints 1000 words’ — but those words may be dif­fer­ent for each per­son. Some­times, you might cre­ate your own mean­ing for a pho­to­graph you en­counter; how­ever, it can be nice to know the true story be

New Zealand D-Photo - - CONTENTS - Pho­tog­ra­pher: JEANETTE NEE

Dis­cover the sto­ries be­hind three stun­ning pho­to­graphs

D-Photo: What’s the name of this photo?

Jeanette Nee: Sil­vereyes.

Can you de­scribe where you were when you cap­tured this im­age?

[I was] on a curved track pad­dock on our farm.

What stood out to you that this would make a great shot? What in­spired you to take this pho­to­graph?

[ The fact that you’d end up] hav­ing two birds, not just one, in the im­age [was a stand­out].

How much plan­ning went into it?

[ This pho­to­graph was all down to] luck.

What did you do to edit this im­age, and why did you make the ad­just­ments that you did?

I checked his­togram in RAW and ad­justed ex­po­sure in lev­els to make the im­age pop.

What in­ter­ested you in pursuing pho­tog­ra­phy?

The beauty of birds and [their] be­hav­iour.

If peo­ple want to see more of your work, where can they find you?

On Face­book and the Tau­ranga Pho­to­graphic So­ci­ety web­site. [I was the] supreme win­ner in the Birds Aplenty com­pe­ti­tion in Whakatane last year, [as well as] last year’s New Zealand Ge­o­graphic run­ner-up [in the] Wildlife [cat­e­gory].

D-Photo: What’s the name of this photo?

Terry Ur­ban: The name of this pho­to­graph is Tide’s Out.

Can you de­scribe where you were when you cap­tured this im­age?

I was down at the Boul­der Bank area, in Nel­son.

What stood out to you that this would make a great shot? What in­spired you to take this pho­to­graph?

What in­spired me to take this photo was [that] I’ve pho­tographed this area many times with my DSLR, as I’ve al­ways been fas­ci­nated by the pat­terns left in the mud by the re­ced­ing tide, and I won­dered what it would look like from above, so as soon as I got this drone I wanted to go out there and see the mud flats from the air. I thought this would be a great shot be­cause of the fas­ci­nat­ing pat­tern of trenches and chan­nels the out­go­ing tide left be­hind, and, when I looked down on it, the scene wasn’t ob­vi­ously mud flats — it could have been in a desert, or on an­other planet — so the ‘lo­ca­tion’ be­ing pho­tographed could take the viewer to any place their imag­i­na­tion con­jured up.

How much plan­ning went into it?

I’ve made many trips here over the last few years with my DSLR, so I al­ready knew the area, I just had to wait for the low tide to co­in­cide with the right weather con­di­tions for fly­ing the drone. There have been very strong winds here for the last two to three months, so get­ting calm weather at low tide took a while.

What is the mes­sage that you hope peo­ple take from see­ing this im­age?

That drone pho­tog­ra­phy is an in­ter­est­ing new medium, and ar­eas which don’t of­fer great photo ops at ground level can be very dif­fer­ent when viewed from above. There are other view­points in life that we just don’t see if we don’t ex­pand our hori­zons.

What did you do to edit this im­age, and why did you make the ad­just­ments that you did?

Edit­ing was done on my iPad Pro. I added con­trast and ad­justed the colour to make it look more like mud, be­cause it had a sil­ver sheen [orig­i­nally].

What in­ter­ested you in pursuing pho­tog­ra­phy?

I carve green­stone for a liv­ing, so I’m al­ways look­ing for new in­spi­ra­tion for de­signs. Five years ago, a friend loaned me his cam­era, and I went ex­plor­ing the bush and beaches around [me]. I dis­cov­ered it was very re­lax­ing and a great way to recharge my bat­ter­ies. I loved that I had a new medium to cre­ate art, and I head off now ev­ery chance I get.

If peo­ple want to see more of your work, where can they find you?

Peo­ple can find my pho­tos on my Face­book page ‘Through My Eyes Pho­tos by Terry Ur­ban’, In­sta­gram (@ter­rynzyank), and my green­stone carv­ings can be found at the­jadestu­dionz.com.

D-Photo: What’s the name of this photo?

Briar Hubbard: Alexan­dra.

Can you de­scribe where you were when you cap­tured this im­age?

I was pho­tograph­ing a friend’s wed­ding at Vi­la­grad Win­ery in Cam­bridge ear­lier this year. Un­for­tu­nately for the win­ery, the cel­lar burned down; how­ever, the blaze left be­hind some of the build­ing, which made for some eye-catch­ing back­drops.

What stood out to you that this would make a great shot? What in­spired you to take this pho­to­graph?

I have al­ways loved the idea of cre­at­ing a stark con­trast by pho­tograph­ing a bride in a beau­ti­ful dress in a derelict area. It’s been on my to-do list for years, and I was fi­nally able to tick that one off by tak­ing this pho­to­graph. I love the charred marks of the wall be­hind her, and how el­e­gant Alexan­dra looks. While sun-flare pho­tos can be over­done, I feel like the flare cov­er­ing the top of her body gives the pho­to­graph an ethe­real feel.

How much plan­ning went into it?

I had been on a lo­ca­tion scout a few days ear­lier, and I knew straight away [that] this build­ing would pro­vide a range of beau­ti­ful back­drops. On the day of the wed­ding, the sun cre­ated a lot of harsh light­ing, and, for a while, I thought my dreams of achiev­ing this photo would be dashed. But, in a case of be­ing in the right place at the right time, the height of the wall dif­fused the sun’s rays per­fectly, and pro­vided a dreamy, sun­set feel.

What is the mes­sage you hope peo­ple take from see­ing this im­age?

I hope it in­spires peo­ple to un­der­stand the im­por­tance of recruiting a wed­ding pho­tog­ra­pher that they love. A wed­ding is a unique chance to cap­ture so many im­por­tant things. It’s of­ten when the cou­ple look their best in a lo­ca­tion they have cho­sen, with all their favourite peo­ple sur­round­ing them. Wed­dings are filled to the brim with emo­tion, and hav­ing a wed­ding pho­tog­ra­pher on hand to cap­ture those mo­ments is some­thing I think ev­ery cou­ple can value.

What did you do to edit this im­age, and why did you make the ad­just­ments that you did?

I tr y to be care­ful that I don’t over­ex­pose any high­lights while shoot­ing, which re­sulted in this im­age need­ing to be bright­ened. I also added warmth by us­ing split ton­ing and ad­just­ing the tem­per­a­ture in [Adobe] Light­room. I soft­ened the sun flare by cre­at­ing a brush to tone it down, as orig­i­nally it was too dis­tract­ing for my lik­ing. I still wanted to keep it in the im­age, as this is what makes it unique. I also sharp­ened the pho­to­graph, added a slight vi­gnette to add to the dreamy look, light­ened the shad­ows, dark­ened the high­lights, and slightly blurred the wall be­hind her, to al­low Alexan­dra to stand out from the back­ground.

What in­ter­ested you in pursuing pho­tog­ra­phy?

I am drawn to wed­ding pho­tog­ra­phy be­cause there is so much love, pos­i­tiv­ity, warmth, and emo­tion through­out the day. In our day-to­day lives, we fre­quently tr y to sub­due our emo­tions, but, dur­ing a wed­ding, that emo­tion is un­guarded and raw. I en­joy wit­ness­ing the roller coaster that the cou­ple are on — the nerves; the ex­cite­ment; the re­lief; and, most im­por­tantly, the love they have for one an­other.

If peo­ple want to see more of your work, where can they find you? Web­site: wed­dings­by­briar.com Face­book: Wed­dings by Briar In­sta­gram: @wed­dings­by­briar

CANON 1D MARK IV, F/5.6, 1/4000S, ISO 400

CANON EOS 6D, 85MM, F/4, 1/640S, ISO 100

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