BEN­E­FITS OF KISS­ING

New Zealand Woman’s Weekly - - HEALTH & FAMILY -

KISS­ING PUTS YOU IN A BET­TER MOOD Hav­ing a blue day? Give your loved one a kiss be­fore head­ing out to work – it will in­stantly boost your mood. Kiss­ing raises lev­els of oxy­tocin, which is the chem­i­cal in the brain as­so­ci­ated with trust and at­tach­ment. An ex­per­i­ment con­ducted at Lafayette Col­lege in the US be­tween pairs who kissed for 15 min­utes while lis­ten­ing to mu­sic showed spikes in the chem­i­cal. Wendy Hill, dean of the fac­ulty, said that “in a test group that merely held hands, chem­i­cal changes were sim­i­lar but much less pro­nounced”.

STRONGER IM­MU­NITY

It might not sound pleas­ant but the whirlpool of saliva be­tween you and your mate could be pre­vent­ing you from get­ting the lat­est dreaded cold go­ing around. A study car­ried out in 2014 for the jour­nal Mi­cro­biome found that cou­ples who kissed fre­quently shared sali­vary mi­cro­biota, which forces your body to make an­ti­bod­ies to bat­tle the for­eign bac­te­ria.

And just in case you were won­der­ing, an av­er­age of 80 mil­lion bac­te­ria are trans­ferred dur­ing a 10-sec­ond smooch.

COM­PAT­I­BIL­ITY CUES

A pash can tell you far more about your love in­ter­est than any photo or on­line dat­ing pro­file. Bi­o­log­i­cal an­thro­pol­o­gist Dr He­len Fisher ex­plained on chem­istry.com that in a study of 58 men and 122 women, 59% of men and 66% of women said they had ended a ro­mance af­ter the first kiss. “With this little act, you learn a huge amount about your could-be part­ner,” she writes. “First you can see, smell, taste, hear and feel them bet­ter. In­stantly, these mes­sages from your senses are picked up by some of your nerves and es­corted di­rectly to your brain. There they ig­nite, giv­ing you first-hand in­for­ma­tion about your part­ner’s health, their eat­ing, drink­ing and smok­ing habits, and their state of mind – from their sense of ur­gency to calm­ness.”

BURN CALO­RIES

Fi­nally some ex­er­cise we

START­ING THE DAY WITH A LOV­ING SMOOCH NOT ONLY BRINGS A COU­PLE CLOSER – YOU’LL BOTH FEEL FAB TOO!

can re­ally get be­hind! While a small peck might mean you use just a cou­ple of fa­cial mus­cles, a sus­tained pas­sion­ate em­brace can use up to 34 mus­cles, burn­ing 26 calo­ries per minute. If you can keep the ac­tiv­ity go­ing with­out get­ting lock­jaw, what that means is 10 min­utes of in­tense kiss­ing will burn off that cheeky piece of choco­late cake you had with your cof­fee this morn­ing. Rejoice!

STRESS RE­LIEF

You’ve had back-to-back bor­ing meet­ings, im­pos­si­ble dead­lines and a phone call from at least one rel­a­tive en­veloped in some sort of cri­sis – your stress lev­els are at an all-time high and the last thing on your mind is kiss­ing. But that’s exactly what you should do. Lock­ing lips is known to re­duce the stress hor­mone cor­ti­sol. What’s more, ac­cord­ing to a study en­ti­tled The Neu­ro­bi­ol­ogy of Love, stress might ac­tu­ally en­cour­age to kiss more of­ten. “Stres­sors can trig­ger a search for plea­sure, prox­im­ity and close­ness, and some de­gree of strong yet man­age­able stress may be nec­es­sary for very strong bonds to form,” the study finds.

FEWER AL­LER­GIES

Hay fever suf­fer­ers, this one’s for you. If you’re pre­pared to com­mit to half an hour of back-and-forth snog­ging, you may find those in­ces­sant snif­fles start to ease up. A Ja­panese study pub­lished in Phys­i­ol­o­gya nd Be­hav­iour showed that when pa­tients who suf­fered from atopic der­mati­tis or al­ler­gic rhini­tis resur­faced fol­low­ing 30 min­utes of pri­vately kiss­ing to soft mu­sic, their symp­toms, in­clud­ing hives and lev­els of plasma neu­rotrophin, were re­lieved. Sneez­ing’s never been so sexy!

Kiss­ing boosts your mood and your im­mu­nity!

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