Whey

NZ Lifestyle Block - - Feature Clever Ways With Leftovers -

When you make cheese, en­zymes are added to the milk caus­ing it to sep­a­rate into solids and liq­uid. The solids, or curds, are strained and be­come the cheese, and the re­main­ing liq­uid is a watery, high-pro­tein sub­stance called whey.

Whey has a mild sweet­ness and faint acid­ity that ac­tu­ally com­ple­ments a wide range of flavours, both sweet and savoury, but if you can’t use it straight away in one of the fol­low­ing ways, just freeze it for later.

USE IT AS A NU­TRI­TIOUS FEED

If you have an­i­mals, whey can be a great sup­ple­ment to their nor­mal food. My chick­ens, pigs, dog and

cats all fight over it.

MAKE RI­COTTA

If you haven’t had enough of cheese­mak­ing al­ready, you can use whey to make ri­cotta. Ri­cotta means ‘re­cooked’ be­cause you have al­ready used the milk once to make curds and whey. If you boil the whey with a new co­ag­u­late, you draw out more curd and cre­ate ri­cotta.

MARI­NADE YOUR MEAT

You can use whey in any dairy-based meat dish. A whey-mari­nade for meat makes it very ten­der so if a recipe calls to mar­i­nate meat in yo­ghurt or milk, you can use whey in­stead.

STOCK RE­PLACE­MENT

Whey makes an ex­cel­lent sub­sti­tute for wa­ter or stock when cook­ing dried beans, or in any blitzed-up green soup.

USE IT IN YOUR BAK­ING

You can sub­sti­tute whey for milk or wa­ter when you make bread, cakes, and bis­cuits. The ac­tive cul­tures in the whey add depth to the flavour of bread, and the acids con­trib­ute to a softer crumb.

It can also sub­sti­tute for milk in break­fast pan­cakes for the kids or in your favourite break­fast smoothie with­out al­ter­ing the taste.

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