THE FOUR-LINK SUS­PEN­SION DE­SIGN HAS LONG BEEN THE GO-TO FOR DIFF SET UPS; HELL, IT’S BEEN AROUND SO LONG, WE’RE PRETTY SURE JE­SUS HAD THE SAME SET UP ON HIS WOODEN CART. NICK MITCHELL FROM MITCHELL RACE EX­TREME GIVE US THE LOW DOWN ON DESIGNING AND TUNIN

NZ Performance Car - - Tec hback to school -

For those of you with in­de­pen­dent rear ends, look away now, as this piece is not for you. But the four-link is prob­a­bly the most com­mon form of rear link, not only in mod­i­fied road and race cars, but also on some early fac­tory live rear axles; think RX-2s and KE Corol­las. If you’re choos­ing a new set up for your rear, there are bet­ter ones out there, but it al­ways comes down to the ap­pli­ca­tion of the ve­hi­cle — cir­cuit, drift, drag, or road — power out­put, and, of course, bud­get! A lot of the time, it’s not just about chuck­ing in some new brack­ets and arms; the diff hous­ing set-up will need to be looked at, es­pe­cially if more power has found its way into the front of the ve­hi­cle. Pack­ag­ing can also play a role in the de­sign, and will de­pend not only on whether a full four-link will fit in the chas­sis you are work­ing with, but, if it’s a road car, whether you still want to re­tain the rear seat. The lo­ca­tion of chas­sis rails is im­por­tant, and most ap­pli­ca­tions will try to keep the arms just in­side or out­side of the rails — this gives a good an­chor point for the for­ward mount­ing plates. Wheel size is an­other thing to con­sider when designing the set-up.

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