GEN­UINE REPLI­CAS BRO

WE GET THE LOWDOWN ON HOW TO SAVE YOUR­SELF SOME TEARS, AND IDEN­TIFY THOSE PESKY KNOCK-OFFS, WHEN IT COMES TO BUY­ING A SEC­OND-HAND BRIDE BUCKET SEAT

NZ Performance Car - - Contents -

YOU WILL OF­TEN SEE SETS OF ‘GEN­UINE’ BRIDE SEATS LISTED FOR SALE FOR A PRICE THAT SEEMS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE. WE SHOW YOU HOW TO SPOT THE DIF­FER­ENCE BE­TWEEN THE REAL AND THE FAKE, SO YOU KNOW EX­ACTLY WHAT TO WATCH OUT FOR

Fake, replica, knock-offs, or ‘gen­uine-as’ bro — we’ve all come across th­ese words when hunt­ing down the parts we want. But you might be ask­ing your­self, why does in­den­ti­fy­ing them mat­ter? When it comes to safety equip­ment — well, most parts, re­ally — us­ing untested, cheaply man­u­fac­tured ex­am­ples can be dan­ger­ous, and in some cases, life threat­en­ing. That’s es­pe­cially so when you con­sider what could hap­pen if a bucket seat does not live up to its ex­pected pur­pose upon im­pact, and there are hor­ror sto­ries of driv­ers be­ing thrown about the cabin and in­jured as a re­sult of ‘replica’ units snap­ping in half. It’s safe to say that out of all the seat brands that are copied around the world, Bride Ja­pan has been hit the hard­est. On any given day you will find mul­ti­ple pairs be­ing slung on Facebook trade groups, and pop­ping open a door at a meet will most likely pro­vide a good ex­am­ple of how com­mon they have be­come. Finding a cer­ti­fied, gen­uine Bride is like finding that 10mm socket you dropped into the en­gine bay two years ago. The com­pany states that fake prod­ucts do not un­dergo im­por­tant in­ten­sity test­ing, and of­ten have a weak struc­ture, “An au­to­mo­bile seat is an im­por­tant safety-re­lated part: please do not use a fake prod­uct by any means, for it is very dan­ger­ous”.

We had a chat with New Zealand Bride dis­trib­u­tor Mike, at Prosport Auto, about how to spot a gem from a turd.

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