JOR­DAN SPI­ETH SWING ANAL­Y­SIS

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If I were asked to de­scribe Jor­dan Spi­eth’s golf game in two words, I would say ‘re­fresh­ingly bor­ing’. Why? Be­cause the stan­dard of his en­tire game is so high yet no par­tic­u­lar facet screams out as be­ing spec­tac­u­lar. You’ll never see him launch­ing his ev­ery sinew of mus­cle at the ball in an at­tempt to crunch a 350yd drive. Nor will you ever see him hit­ting his wedges so hard that an un­known amount of back­spin will take ef­fect upon land­ing on the green.

At Au­gusta most play­ers de­cide that to score well on the par 5s over­pow­er­ing them in two blows is the best op­tion. This year Spi­eth opted to play most of them as three shot­ters, con­fi­dent that by do­ing so his for­mi­da­ble wedge play would re­sult in short birdie putts and there­fore not lose him ground on the rest of the field.

A wise man once said “work hard­est on your weak­nesses not on your strengths”. Spi­eth doesn’t ap­pear to have any flaws in his game but I guar­an­tee he will have iden­ti­fied some.

His great­est strength? Easy, it’s the five inches be­tween his ears. Ku­dos should go to his par­ents for nur­tur­ing him into the ma­ture and hum­ble char­ac­ter he has be­come at only 21 years of age.

Fail­ing in­jury, Spi­eth will re­tire a mul­ti­ple ma­jor win­ner.

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