Rus­sians have dirt on Trump - CNN

The Dominion Post - - World -

UNITED STATES: Clas­si­fied doc­u­ments pre­sented last week to US Pres­i­dent-elect Don­ald Trump in­cluded al­le­ga­tions that Rus­sian in­tel­li­gence op­er­a­tives claim to have com­pro­mis­ing in­for­ma­tion about him, CNN has re­ported.

The al­le­ga­tions were in a twopage syn­op­sis ap­pended to a re­port pre­sented by US in­tel­li­gence of­fi­cials to Trump and Pres­i­dent Barack Obama on Rus­sian in­ter­fer­ence in the 2016 elec­tion, CNN said, cit­ing mul­ti­ple US of­fi­cials with di­rect knowl­edge of the brief­ings.

The al­le­ga­tions came in part from memos com­piled by a for­mer Bri­tish in­tel­li­gence op­er­a­tive, whose past work US in­tel­li­gence of­fi­cials con­sider cred­i­ble.

The FBI is in­ves­ti­gat­ing cred­i­bil­ity and ac­cu­racy of the the al­le­ga­tions, which were based pri­mar­ily on in­for­ma­tion from Rus­sian sources.

Trump re­sponded yes­ter­day with a tweet call­ing the re­ports: ‘‘FAKE NEWS - A TO­TAL PO­LIT­I­CAL WITCH HUNT!’’

The FBI, the CIA, the White House and Trump’s tran­si­tion team all de­clined to com­ment.

Al­le­ga­tions that Rus­sia at­tempted to com­pro­mise the New York real es­tate busi­ness­man have been cir­cu­lat­ing in Wash­ing­ton for months, and were pre­sented to US of­fi­cials last year.

The warn­ing to Trump co­in­cides with grow­ing con­cern about what Di­rec­tor of Na­tional In­tel­li­gence James Clap­per has called a ‘‘mul­ti­faceted’’ Rus­sian in­flu­ence and es­pi­onage cam­paign in Europe and the US.

An un­clas­si­fied in­tel­li­gence re­port re­leased last week­end con­cluded that Rus­sian Pres­i­dent Vladimir Putin or­dered an ef­fort to help Trump’s elec­toral chances by dis­cred­it­ing his Demo­cratic ri­val Hil­lary Clin­ton in the 2016 pres­i­den­tial cam­paign.

The clas­si­fied brief­ings last week were pre­sented by Clap­per, FBI di­rec­tor James Comey, CIA di­rec­tor John Bren­nan and NSA di­rec­tor Mike Rogers.

One rea­son the US in­tel­li­gence chiefs took the ex­tra­or­di­nary step of in­clud­ing the syn­op­sis in the brief­ing doc­u­ments was to make Trump aware that al­le­ga­tions about him were cir­cu­lat­ing among in­tel­li­gence agen­cies, se­nior mem­bers of Congress and gov­ern­ment of­fi­cials, CNN said.

A se­nior US of­fi­cial with ac­cess to the doc­u­ment said the al­le­ga­tions were pre­sented partly to un­der­score the fact that Rus­sia had em­bar­rass­ing in­for­ma­tion on both ma­jor can­di­dates but only re­leased ma­te­rial that might harm Clin­ton.

If true, the in­for­ma­tion sug­gests that Moscow has as­sem­bled dam­ag­ing in­for­ma­tion – known in es­pi­onage cir­cles by the Rus­sian term ‘‘kom­pro­mat’’ – that con­ceiv­ably could be used to co­erce the next oc­cu­pant of the White House.

The syn­op­sis also in­cluded al­le­ga­tions of on­go­ing con­tact be­tween mem­bers of Trump’s in­ner cir­cle and rep­re­sen­ta­tives of Moscow.

Dossiers com­piled by a for­mer West­ern in­tel­li­gence of­fi­cial have been cir­cu­lat­ing in Wash­ing­ton for months.

Com­piled ini­tially dur­ing early 2016 and sup­ple­mented dur­ing and af­ter the elec­tion, the re­ports in­clude de­tailed al­le­ga­tions that the Rus­sians have com­pro­mis­ing ma­te­rial about Trump, some of it ob­tained when he vis­ited Moscow in 2013 for the Miss Uni­verse pageant, and on a pre­vi­ous visit to Rus­sia.

Other re­ports com­piled by the of­fi­cial al­lege con­tacts be­tween Trump per­son­nel and busi­ness of­fi­cials and Rus­sian of­fi­cials dur­ing the elec­tion cam­paign.

The of­fi­cial was at one point paid to ex­plore Trump’s ties to Rus­sia by anti-Trump Repub­li­cans and later by sup­port­ers of the Demo­cratic Party. Some of the claims have been de­nied by Trump of­fi­cials.

- Reuters, Wash­ing­ton Post

PHOTO: REUTERS

The com­pro­mis­ing ma­te­rial Rus­sia al­legedly has on Don­ald Trump in­cludes in­for­ma­tion from vis­its the US pres­i­dent-elect made to Rus­sia, one of which was for the Miss Uni­verse con­test.

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