Get on board for a filthy, funny trip

The Invercargill Eye - - YOUR HEALTH -

cul­ture. And it re­minds us, force­fully and hi­lar­i­ously, that great com­edy nearly al­ways comes from a place of great anger and in­se­cu­rity.

New­comer Tif­fany Had­dish in par­tic­u­lar strips the paint off the walls in a cou­ple of scenes. Up against her far bet­ter-known and more-es­tab­lished co-stars, Had­dish threat­ens to run off with ev­ery scene she’s in. In a film full of near­house­hold names, it’s the new­bie who slays the old guard, again.

Girls Trip is ev­ery­thing you want out of an R16 buddy-re­union movie. It is truly funny, touch­ing when it needs to be, re­lent­lessly filthy and glee­fully puerile at times. But it is also some­thing more. There is a point be­ing made here about the recla­ma­tion and nor­mal­i­sa­tion of black voices and women’s voices within a genre that has been the pre­serve of the ‘‘dudes’’ for far too long.

I said about Brides­maids that it was more than just a wildly suc­cess­ful film, it was a mod­estly tri­umphant one. The same ap­plies to Girls Trip I reckon, but even more so. – Graeme Tuck­ett

Girls Trip is The Hang­over, Brides­maids and a dozen lesser films right down to its chas­sis. It’s also an as­sault on a truck load of as­sump­tions about gen­der and race. New­comer Tif­fany Had­dish in par­tic­u­lar strips the paint off the walls in a cou­ple of scenes.

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