Caus­tic critic cops come­up­pance dur­ing glam ‘gotcha!’ at the Globe

The Tribune (NZ) - - YOUR PAPER, YOUR PLACE -

Schaden­freude is that de­li­cious German word for tak­ing plea­sure in some­one else’s mis­for­tune. Silly Cow‘ s Doris Wal­lis is a pro­fes­sional at it, par­tic­u­larly good at dish­ing the dirt and caus­ing ca­reer catas­tro­phe for oth­ers.

A one-woman me­dia mafia hit squad, Doris is also de­fend­ing a law­suit from a fe­male ac­tor she has im­pugned, while flirt­ing with an ed­i­tor of a for­eign startup pub­li­ca­tion, and pre­par­ing a pitch for her own re­al­ity TV show.

Her high-fly­ing em­pire is an­chored by Peggy, her dowdy but no-non­sense as­sis­tant, and Douglas her dour downto-earth ac­coun­tant. But as Doris sits

RE­VIEW

Silly Cow, Globe The­atre, Novem­ber 17 - De­cem­ber 10. Re­viewed by RichardMays.

cen­tre stage in her red chair ready for her court case and a guest slot on Gra­ham Nor­ton, the au­di­ence is primed for her to be tipped out of it.

Jen­nifer Moss plays nicely against type as the me­dia maven most love to hate.

The first half is quite the talk-fest with fewer laughs per para­graph than might be ex­pected even with Ben El­ton’s bit­ing zingers and added con­tem­po­rary ref­er­ences, en­hanced by back-screened vis­ual gags and raunchy mu­sic videos.

De­spite an ex­cel­lent Gael Hain­ing Ede as the down-beat Peggy, and a chip­per scotch-slug­ging Si­mon Herbert as would-be ed­i­tor Syd­ney, the comic timing wasn’t quite right.

The sec­ond half comes to­gether to deliver come­up­pance in a much more sat­is­fy­ing way.

Silly Cow‘ s pro­duc­tion team is to be com­mended for their in­no­va­tive ap­proach to up­dat­ing, stag­ing and pre­sent­ing this satiric slice of 90s schaden­freude.

Jen­nifer Moss as Doris Wal­lis in Ben El­ton’s ‘‘Silly Cow’’.

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