Not giv­ing up on land­lines just yet

Wairarapa News - - OUT & ABOUT -

Some say lan­d­line tele­phone con­nec­tions are on the way out, but in a re­gion that has patchy cell­phone cov­er­age, the good old ter­res­trial lan­d­line is still a ne­ces­sity for many. Weasked peo­ple on Neigh­bourly if they have gone fully cel­lu­lar or they are keep­ing their lan­d­line. Sixty-nine per cent said they still have a lan­d­line.

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JO GIB­SON OF MASTER­TON:

‘‘I work for an or­gan­i­sa­tion with a num­ber of re­tired folk at the helm - and the ma­jor­ity loathe mo­bile phones big-time... I have far more per­sonal con­tact with them by re­tain­ing the lan­d­line.’’

HE­LEN MCKEN­ZIE OF MART­IN­BOR­OUGH:

‘‘Have a lan­d­line, avail­able dur­ing power cuts. Cells only last til trans­mit­ter power goes. Very frus­trat­ing not be­ing able to con­tact peo­ple who are not close friends when they do not have a lan­d­line - also a lot more ex­pen­sive to ring their cell phones if you do know their num­bers. Texts are just not the same (if you have cell phone cov­er­age!)’’

MARQUERITE WIL­LIAMS OF MASTER­TON:

‘‘Lan­d­line gives a more sta­ble in­ter­net con­nec­tion when work­ing from home than naked broad­band, es­pe­cially when you VPN in to net­works. Mo­bile is a bit spotty where we are too.’’

NI­CHOLAS CURZON OF GREY­TOWN:

‘‘Given the patchy and in­ter­mit­tent cell phone sig­nal at home (Grey­town, hardly ru­ral) we would find it frus­trat­ing with­out our lan­d­line. We use our mo­biles very rarely and make most of our calls through the lan­d­line.’’

CAROL GOULD OF FEATHER­STON:

‘‘We don’t have a lan­d­line and I re­cently con­vinced my mother she didn’t need pay to $46 per month for hers, when she al­ready had a mo­bile phone. A big help to her pen­sion bud­get.’’

MEL DEN­NI­SON OF EKETAHUNA:

‘‘Haven’t had a phone line in al­most 3 years. It was an ex­tra cost that wasn’t nec­es­sary, es­pe­cially as we don’t use all the min­utes on our cell­phones as it is.’’

NORMA DOUGAN OF GLAD­STONE:

‘‘We mostly use our lan­d­line as our mo­bile is mar­ginal, for power cuts and when we are ex­pe­ri­enc­ing power surges.’’ For the last two years, at least, a kind per­son has left citrus fruit on pub­lic seats and in some banks, for the pub­lic to take.

As my le­mon tree is too young to bear fruit just yet, I for one re­ally ap­pre­ci­ate this source of vi­ta­min C in the win­ter!

Just re­cently I have been en­joy­ing the de­li­cious grape­fruit that I picked up from a seat in the town.

It seems this is an anony­mous per­son, but hope­fully if he/she reads this, and you put it in print, I would like them to know that this kind ges­ture is very much ap­pre­ci­ated.

Mary Lacy, Carter­ton WRITE TO US

Do you feel strongly about an is­sue in your com­mu­nity or have some­thing to say about your town? Con­tact us: piers.fuller@fair­fax­me­dia.co.nz or PO Box 902, Master­ton. Please use your full name and con­tact num­ber, no anony­mous let­ters will be ac­cepted.

LET­TER TO THE ED­I­TOR

While some have dropped their land­lines for the cell, many Wairarapa peo­ple still keep a lan­d­line op­er­at­ing.

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