UP­FRONT

Edi­tor’s Let­ter; Things We Love; Me­gan Ni­col Reed

Weekend Herald - Canvas - - CONTENTS -

As I’m writ­ing this, it’s Hal­loween eve. My el­dest daugh­ter, who is 10, asked me last night if she could go trick-or-treat­ing with three friends from 4.30pm to 6.30pm. Sure, I said, dis­tract­edly, won­der­ing how we’d jug­gle the younger one’s swim­ming lessons and pick­ing up the dog from doggy day care (I know) and my dead­line. So I texted the mum of one of her friends, to see if my daugh­ter could go home with hers. That was all fine, but she asked what I thought about them go­ing un­su­per­vised; there’d been some dis­cus­sion with the other par­ents about whether they were up to it. I must ad­mit it hadn’t oc­curred to me to con­sider if they needed su­per­vi­sion, but I am on the more re­laxed side of the par­ent­ing scale. And then I read Greg Bruce’s in­ter­view with Wil­liam Trubridge, who spent the first 10 years of his life on a yacht, sailing around the world with his par­ents. “The sea was our fam­ily’s means of transport, our source of pro­tein, our play­ground and our class­room,” he writes in his new mem­oir. Trubridge has gone on to be the world cham­pion free­d­iver: some­one who dives to depths of be­yond 100m, able to re­turn to the sur­face, con­scious, with­out fins or any other help. And I thought of our daugh­ters, and I thought they would be okay.

MICHELLE HUR­LEY

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