I have a dream

Daily Trust - - VIEWS -

The last time I dreamt that a Shoe­less Joe would be­come the ruler of my people; it came to pass –as a nightmare. But dreams are part of our daily lives, and night­mares are not suf­fi­cient to stop us dream­ing. So, here I go again.

I have a dream, that the son or daugh­ter (em­pha­sis on daugh­ter) of a Hausa peas­ant from the re­motest part of Are­wa­land would one day be­come the pres­i­dent of a one, united Naija. That the can­di­dacy and elec­tion would not be de­ter­mined in a church, mosque or shrine but on the strength of their char­ac­ter and the plau­si­ble man­i­festo of a party that primed to move the na­tion for­ward.

I have a dream. That right­eous­ness would en­ve­lope this na­tion; that those who spon­sor killers would come out to the town and city square; and, on their knees, make con­fes­sions with true re­pen­tance ask for real for­give­ness and kick start the process of heal­ing.

I have a dream. That loot­ers and their off­spring would one day make a town, vil­lage or city square their con­fes­sion ground. That they will re­lease se­cret code to their Swiss ac­counts and faith­fully de­clare their for­eign ac­counts to a govern­ment of the people, for the people by the people who would in turn ac­cept their apol­ogy; take the pro­ceeds of our com­mon wealth, and rebuild the bro­ken walls of our in­fra­struc­ture.

I have a dream. That the son of a rev­erend, bishop or what­ever ti­tle, would be mar­ried to the daugh­ter of an Imam or grand mufti in a church, mosque or court. Oh, I have a dream, that their off­spring will be in­dis­tin­guish­able by their names. I have a dream, that a Hausa man would name his daugh­ter Nkechi and that the Ibo man would call his son Has­san. I have a dream that ev­ery child would be able to claim the city in which they were born, ir­re­spec­tive of where their par­ents orig­i­nated to prove the gen­uine­ness of our fed­er­al­ism.

I have a dream. That one day, the people who serve would no longer run the people who voted off the road. Oh, I have a dream. That one day, a gover­nor would queue at a pop­u­lar su­per­mar­ket to buy his gro­cery just like any other per­son. I have a dream, that when his son or daugh­ter weds, no dime of pub­lic money would be

I have a dream; that the sons and daugh­ters of Euro­peans, Amer­i­cans and other na­tions would queue up at Naija em­bassies and­con­sulates abroad ask­ing for visas to visit our par­adise in the sun. I mean I have a dream, that those who stole our money to buy property abroad would auc­tion them and re­turn with the loot to rebuild their moth­er­land

spent ei­ther to en­ter­tain guests, or to trans­port them. I have a dream, that one day, the eleven or twelve pres­i­den­tial jets would be auc­tioned off and its cash used to pro­vide real trans­porta­tion to all nooks and cran­nies of this coun­try.

Oh I have a dream. That one day the uni­form would be seen as a badge of hon­our and not a sym­bol of op­pres­sion. I have a dream. That one day, the armed forces be­come the people’s army, trained to hon­our and re­spect them and pro­tect them at all times with zeal. Oh I have a dream, that one day, the women and chil­dren would line up the streets to wel­come home their troops from in­ter­na­tional mis­sions, climb their tanks and dec­o­rate them with gar­lands for be­ing wor­thy am­bas­sadors.

I have a dream. That one day, the po­lice would be our friend and no longer tor­tur­ers, or killers. I have a dream; I saw the end of ac­ci­den­tal dis­charge. Oh I have a dream. That one day, check points would no longer be nec­es­sary, as all the armed rob­bers are gain­fully en­gaged and the kid­nap­pers and rit­u­al­ists have dis­cov­ered the sense­less­ness of their blood­let­ting and em­braced peace.

I have a dream; that the sons and daugh­ters of Euro­peans, Amer­i­cans and other na­tions would queue up at Naija em­bassies and con­sulates abroad ask­ing for visas to visit our par­adise in the sun. I mean I have a dream, that those who stole our money to buy property abroad would auc­tion them and re­turn with the loot to rebuild their moth­er­land.

Yes I have a dream, that one day lec­tur­ers would turn down of­fers to mi­grate but stay and mould minds. Oh I have a dream, that lec­tur­ers re­gard their stu­dents as as­sets and not bush al­lowances. I have a dream that Eedris’ Mr Lec­turer is fic­tion in the ears of those that hear them.

I have a dreams; that the terms – north, west, east and south would mean noth­ing other than car­di­nal points; Chris­tian, Mus­lim, an­i­mist mean noth­ing be­cause trib­al­ism, sec­tion­al­ism, zealotry and big­otry is speared by the fra­grance of love. I have a dream, that this na­tion is a strong, one united na­tion where cit­i­zens sing with mean­ing the words of our na­tional an­them; that the labour of her past he­roes and hero­ines are prac­ti­cally not in vain. I have a dream that no pen­sioner’s funds is mis­man­aged and that work­ers re­ceive just pay for good work.

I have a dream that free­dom, truth and jus­tice flow, on the wa­ters of the Niger through the con­flu­ence of the Benue and in all rivers, streams and trib­u­taries. From this dream may I not wake, un­til it be­comes real.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Nigeria

© PressReader. All rights reserved.