I AM ALSO WELL ES­TAB­LISHED, WELL EX­PE­RI­ENCED, WELL EX­POSED AND A COM­PE­TENT LEADER COM­PARED TO MY COL­LEAGUES WHO ARE NOT IN THE TEACH­ING PRO­FES­SION. I LOVE TEACH­ING AND I AM PROUD TO BE A TEACHER

Sunday Trust - - TAMBARI -

I started Qur’anic ed­u­ca­tion at the age of five un­der Malam Na Yabo and his lovely wife, Modibbo Yaya(May their gen­tle souls rest in per­fect peace). I then pro­ceeded to pri­mary school and got a cer­tifi­cate in 1986. I grad­u­ated from sec­ondary school in 1992, got a Diploma in Ed­u­ca­tion in 2003 and an­other in Com­puter in 2004. I then got a masters de­gree in Ge­og­ra­phy in 2012, and most re­cently, a cer­tifi­cate in Pro­fes­sional Pro­gramme on En­trepreneur­ship in 2017.

I started work­ing as a cler­i­cal as­sis­tant at the Ara­bic Board in Sokoto; from 1993 to1994; then as a pri­mary school teacher at the Uni­ver­sal Ba­sic Ed­u­ca­tion (UBE) with the Wa­makko Lo­cal Gov­ern­ment Ed­u­ca­tion Author­ity (LGEA) from 1999 to 2000. I then be­came a head­mistress; which was a po­si­tion I held till 2002. I be­came a sec­ondary school teacher with the Sokoto Teach­ing Ser­vice Board (STSB) from 2002 to 2003, and since then, I have been with the Shehu Sha­gari Col­lege of Ed­u­ca­tion till date, and also, the Voice of Sokoto State Women As­so­ci­a­tion.

I have faced gen­der in­equal­ity in my work place; be­cause I was de­nied the right to go back and fur­ther my ed­u­ca­tion when I was a cler­i­cal as­sis­tant, un­like my male coun­ter­parts that were given the op­por­tu­nity. My ex­ec­u­tive sec­re­tary called me into his of­fice; that I should choose be­tween my cler­i­cal job and school. As for the school, he said he would not al­low me to go. It is one of the great­est chal­lenges I faced be­cause I re­lied solely on my salary to fur­ther my ed­u­ca­tion. I chose to go back to school and I was sacked.

Over the years, I’ve learnt that hard work, en­durance and prayers lead to suc­cess. I also learnt that truth­ful­ness, hon­esty and love all lead to hap­pi­ness, good liv­ing, wis­dom and dig­nity. Also, fac­ing your own busi­ness, wish­ing peo­ple good as you wish your­self is a lad­der to a suc­cess­ful life; no­body can block my chance be­cause of my strong be­lief in destiny. Fi­nally, noth­ing is worth de­stroy­ing your life for.

The most re­ward­ing part of my ca­reer as a teacher for 18 years is re­spect; dig­nity and in­tegrity within and out­side my com­mu­nity. I am also well es­tab­lished, well ex­pe­ri­enced, well ex­posed and a com­pe­tent leader com­pared to my col­leagues who are not in the teach­ing pro­fes­sion. I love teach­ing and I am proud to be a teacher.

I as­pire to be among the de­ci­sion mak­ers in my state and be­yond. I am also as­pir­ing to be a Pro­fes­sor of Ge­og­ra­phy in’shaa Al­lah, as well as an icon of love for all.

Play­ing in the moon­light with friends, sis­ters and brothers; it is an amaz­ing mem­ory; es­pe­cially the songs and all the plea­sure.

My joy as a mother is my kids: Yarima Aminu and Si­rajo Aminu (My lit­tle an­gel). I met him through my brother who is his friend.

My most cher­ished at­tributes of his are hon­esty, trust­wor­thi­ness, gen­eros­ity and his dis­like for gos­sip and stingy peo­ple.

To be part of the de­ci­sion mak­ers in ed­u­ca­tion; es­pe­cially for the less priv­i­leged and the girl child. To put a smile on the faces of the aban­doned chil­dren and or­phans. Give the best of ed­u­ca­tion to my chil­dren. Be a woman of in­tegrity in Nige­ria. Be a voice for the voice­less. Blues: es­pe­cially ro­man­tic and love songs. First thing in the morn­ing is prayer and last thing be­fore bed­time is also prayer. Atamfa (lo­cal fab­ric): I am a real north­ern woman by look. Heels. Gold. Mini dresses. Saudi Ara­bia; be­cause I have enough time to wor­ship my God un­der con­ducive

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